A map of Kim Jong-un’s slow train trip to Vietnam

North Korea's Great Leader would rather not fly for his second summit with Trump – but the trip is also a political message to China.

Image: Dhaka Tribune
  • Kim Jong-un is already traveling for his summit with Trump on Wednesday.
  • Rather than flying, he's taking a 60-hour train trip through China.
  • The trip is a closely guarded secret, but this map shows the most likely itinerary.
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Did Trump abandon South Korea at the North Korean summit?

Eugene Gholz, the associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, posits that President Trump's decision to suspend U.S. military operations on the Korean peninsula negates decades of foreign policy.

Eugene Gholz, an associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, argues that President Trump's decision to suspend the U.S. military's training exercises on the Korean peninsula is a lot more nuanced—and a lot more strategic to foreign policy—than perhaps many people realize. Will South Korea be left in the lurch if the US suspends military exercises? Hardly. Eugene is brought to you today by The Charles Koch Foundation. The Charles Koch Foundation aims to further understanding of how US foreign policy affects American people and societal well-being. Through grants, events, and collaborative partnerships, the Foundation is working to stretch the boundaries of foreign policy research and debate by discussing ideas in strategy, trade, and diplomacy that often go unheeded in the US capital. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org.

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America Is Preventing Nuclear Attacks in All the Wrong Ways

There's a deep psychological reason that America treats nuclear weapons like a spoiled child hogging all the neighborhood candy. Are we too paranoid to see it?

Nuclear weapons are an odd conundrum for the world (and indeed the human species) as of late. Remnants of WW2 and indeed the Cold War, they're mostly used now as a kind of insurance policy for the safety of a country. It's like keeping a loaded gun. And like guns, America (no surprises here) has a whole lot of them and (just like a gun) they don't want anyone they don't like to have them. America is even willing to have preventative wars so that other countries don't develop nuclear weapons; which in turn breeds resentment and even more countries that resent us... who then in turn develop more nukes. It's a vicious cycle. And it may not end well. The Charles Koch Foundation aims to further understanding of how US foreign policy affects American people and societal well-being. Through grants, events, and collaborative partnerships, the Foundation is working to stretch the boundaries of foreign policy research and debate by discussing ideas in strategy, trade, and diplomacy that often go unheeded in the US capital. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org.

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North Korea Is Only a Threat if the U.S. Keeps Provoking Kim Jong-un

North Korea has a long history of making bellicose threats that defy global norms. So does that mean the country's leaders are irrational, and will act irrationally?

People watch a news report on North Korea's first hydrogen bomb test at a railroad station in Seoul on January 6, 2016. (JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
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Donald Trump’s Political Strategy Is Inspired By Dark History

If Donald Trump's political strategies look familiar, says Tim Wu, it's because we've seen them before. Where? In the totalitarian regimes of China, North Korea, and Germany.

On November 2nd, Columbia law professor Tim Wu tweeted: "What is the political press going to do for ratings after this blockbuster election winds down?" It’s a funny question, but a serious reflection on the disturbing amount of coverage the Republican candidate has enjoyed. The U.S. has a private media, but the coverage has been skewed one way, and even in his most controversial moments Trump has mostly profited from the millions of dollars of free advertising he has received. Every time you turn on the TV or head to a website’s home page you see one person. Wu draws an interesting parallel between this phenomenon and totalitarian regimes, like North Korea where everywhere you look you see the Great Leader, or China in the ‘60s, where Mao’s face was omnipresent. Trump is inescapable.

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