4 geniuses whose brains were studied by science—and what they reveal

Here are four great brains from great minds, and how they differ from yours.

 

A picture shows a picture and model of Albert Einstein's brain on display during a preview of the Wellcome Collection's major new exhibition 'Brains: mind of matter' in London on March 27, 2012. (MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/Getty Images)

Many people have wondered about the minds of great thinkers. What must Einstein have been thinking when he sat down at his piano and came to the conclusions that gave us relativity? How does such a fantastic mind work? For neuroscientists, who view mental activity as brain activity, some of their curiosity can be satisfied by studying the brains of great thinkers and seeing how they differ from the normal brain.

Now, brain morphology does not always correlate to behavioral differences. The findings listed below may have little to no meaning at all. Brain shape can be altered by things such as daily motor skill practice or dementia. The current data suggests that brain morphology has at most a modest effect on overall intelligence. In some cases, a larger brain makes for lower functionality. This should be kept in mind when reading about these differences between the brain of these geniuses and the average joe.

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Extending Descartes to Embody Our Social Rational Souls

Descartes’ solitary, inward-facing mindset misconstrues the social nature of our thinking. Social Cartesianism better captures the soul of what matters in distinguishing humans from animals or machines.

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