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Chris Hadfield
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20 incredible facts that people recently tweeted

This Twitter thread may provide all the education a person needs.

  • A simple question on Twitter resulted in an avalanche of mind-blowing answers.
  • What else are we supposed to do with all of these stray bits of information?
  • Sciency, helpful, and ridiculous — we've got 'em all.

On January 27, educator, organizer, and writer Brittany Packnett Cunningham tweeted a simple question: "What's the most random fact you know?" It turns out people know a lot of random things — the replies have been stunningly informative, amazing, and ridiculous. Here are 20 of the best facts shared:

1. A tarantula's best friend

So many thoughts. Interspecies slavery? Frog mills?

2. The snap

This might make you feel better if you're one of the many people incapable of doing the African Finger Snap once explained and demonstrated by Lupita Nyong'o.

3. Coincidence?

Mind = blown. Did her folks do this on purpose?

4. Blood stains

This is both amazing and cool. Custom-coded saliva just for your own personal use.

5. Not to worry

Are we the only ones who worry about this? Also, if you don't remove the label before washing the fruit, good luck getting it off.

6. In the event of alligator

One wonders how Ms. Rose, star of "The #1 Ladies Detective Agency" and "The Princess and the Frog," learned this useful survival trick.

7. Listen carefully

Hmmm, mmm, mmm. Whaddya know!

8. The nipple rule

Today is not the day nature stops being weird.

9. Your final sensation in space

Grim, but fascinating. Let's not do this.

10. Dotting your “i”

Because of course.

11. Not who you think they are

Ergo: Respect!

12. Vegans beware

While this is true, the resulting flavoring is so expensive to produce that it rarely gets used in foods. Check the label for castoreum. While you're there, keep an eye out for carmine, which is commonly used as a red coloring for food. It's made from crushed beetles.

13. Stand back or run away

Marine researchers must be very dedicated.

14. Or maybe just swim as fast as you can

Maybe keep your horses away from the ocean.

15. The fine grain of time

Of course "now" is a difficult concept to really comprehend. The moment you notice it, it's gone, as the tweet suggests.

This brings to mind quantum entanglement. Maybe particles don't really exist in multiple states at a time, but our ability to capture "now" is just so coarse it seems that way. Our idea of simultaneity may actually be a series of fine-grained moments rounded off into a single "now" that's large enough for us to perceive. Thus, we perceive multiple particle states as simultaneous but they're really not. Just saying.

16. Million billion

You've wondered, right? A perfect fact for the next conversation lull you need to fill.

17. Nuts in nature

Also, we only see the nuts because some of the discarded parts of the plant are toxic.

18. Orange carrots

Censored vegetables, for goodness' sake.

19. Angular numbers?

Some researchers are skeptical about this origin story, especially when it comes to the symbol for zero.

20. How long you’ll remember all this

What was the first fact on this list?

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