How Different Cultures Around the World Deal With Emotion and Conflict

Germans are cold and hard. Filipinos are warm and soft. Or is that oversimplifying it?

How Different Cultures Around the World Deal With Emotion and Conflict

Negotiating with Filipinos? Be warm and personal, but stay polite. Cutting das Deal with Germans? Stay cool as ice, and be tough as nails. So what happens if you're a German doing business in the Philippines?


That's not the question this map was designed to answer. This map — actually, a diagram — shows differences in attitudes to business negotiations in a number of countries. Familiarise yourself with them, then burn the drawing. From now on, you're a master international dealmaker.

Vertically, the map distinguishes between countries where it is highly haram to show emotions during business proceedings (Japan being the prime example) and countries where emotions are an accepted part of il commercio (yes, Italians are emotional extroverts — also in business). 

The horizontal axis differentiates countries with a very confrontational negotiating style — think heated arguments and slammed doors — from places where decorum is the alpha and omega of commercial dealings. For an extreme example of the former, try trading with an Israeli company. For the latter, I refer you to those personable but (apparently also) persnickety Filipinos.

In general, the map says: For cold-as-fish negotiations, go to northern Europe or eastern Asia. If you want hugs and small talk with your deal, go to a Latin country (or a very cold or hot one — e.g., Russia and India). But are Danes really that much more confrontational than Swedes? And shouldn't the Brits — a people who say “Sorry” when you bump into them — be much further to the right?

Along the other axis, the champions of oppositional negotiating are not just the Israelis and the Germans, but also the Dutch, the French, and Spanish. But weren't the Netherlands and Germany the pioneers and champions of negotiated solutions to economic issues — the so-called "Rhineland Capitalism"?

And how is it that the U.S. gets to be in the business version of the Goldilocks zone — not too confrontational, not too conflict-averse; not too cold, but not overly emotional either? Perhaps, from another perspective — say, Korea — Americans are very expressive and confrontational. Could it be that this diagram shares a defect with the earliest world maps: The cartographers unwittingly reveal their origins by placing themselves at the centre of the map?

This map found here at the Harvard Business Review website. The magazine's December issue is dedicated to the finer (and softer) points of business negotiation. 

Strange Maps #753

Got a strange map? Let me know at strangemaps@gmail.com.

A brief history of human dignity

What is human dignity? Here's a primer, told through 200 years of great essays, lectures, and novels.

Credit: Benjavisa Ruangvaree / AdobeStock
Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies
  • Human dignity means that each of our lives have an unimpeachable value simply because we are human, and therefore we are deserving of a baseline level of respect.
  • That baseline requires more than the absence of violence, discrimination, and authoritarianism. It means giving individuals the freedom to pursue their own happiness and purpose.
  • We look at incredible writings from the last 200 years that illustrate the push for human dignity in regards to slavery, equality, communism, free speech and education.
Keep reading Show less

Mathematical model shows how the Nazis could have won WWII's Battle of Britain

With just a few strategical tweaks, the Nazis could have won one of World War II's most decisive battles.

Photo: Heinrich Hoffmann/ullstein bild via Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The Battle of Britain is widely recognized as one of the most significant battles that occurred during World War II. It marked the first major victory of the Allied forces and shifted the tide of the war.
  • Historians, however, have long debated the deciding factor in the British victory and German defeat.
  • A new mathematical model took into account numerous alternative tactics that the German's could have made and found that just two tweaks stood between them and victory over Britain.
Keep reading Show less

New data reveals Earth closer to a black hole and 16,000 mph faster

A new study shows our planet is much closer to the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center than previously estimated.

Position and velocity map of the Milky Way Galaxy.

Credit: NAOJ
Surprising Science
  • A Japanese radio astronomy project revealed Earth is 2,000 light years closer to the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's center.
  • The data also showed the planet is moving 7 km/s or 16,000 mph faster in orbit around the Galactic Center.
  • The findings don't mean Earth is in more danger from the black hole but reflect better modeling of the galaxy.
  • Keep reading Show less

    How has technology changed — and changed us — in the past 20 years?

    Apple sold its first iPod in 2001, and six years later it introduced the iPhone, which ushered in a new era of personal technology.

    PEDRO UGARTE/AFP via Getty Images
    Technology & Innovation
    Just over 20 years ago, the dotcom bubble burst, causing the stocks of many tech firms to tumble.
    Keep reading Show less
    Surprising Science

    The magic of mushrooms: A mycological trip

    A biologist-reporter investigates his fungal namesake.

    Scroll down to load more…
    Quantcast