Sluggish Economy Offers Significant Opportunities in Cocaine Trafficking

The Global Billionaires Club may be getting smaller by the minute, but there are still pockets of heavy growth. For example, Mexican drug lords are doing well. That's why Forbes magazine's latest list of the world's billionaires includes Mexico's most wanted man, Joaquin Guzman.

The 54-year-old Guzman, who stands at just 5 feet tall and is widely known for his charisma and intelligence, is 701st on the list with an estimated fortune of $1 billion. Said to be head of one of Mexico's most powerful drug cartels, Guzman escaped from a Mexican prison on 2001 and is currently on the lam, possibly in Mexico or Central America.


According to the BBC, Mexican officials "blame much of the recent violence in the north of the country on Mr Guzman." For over a year, Guzman's Sinaloa Cartel has been trying to oust a rival gang from the border city of Ciudad Juarez; the turf war has left more than 2,000 people dead. His wedding in 2007 to his 18-year-old wife was so heavily guarded that the Mexican army did not attempt to arrest the groom.

Drugs are a big business, even in a recession. Forbes estimates that last year Mexican and Colombian traffickers made close to $39bn. And "there is no sign that global drug consumption is falling. And as long as the demand remains, fortunes will be made." Guzman is not the first alleged drug runner to have made it into the illustrious ranks of the Forbes list of billionaires, according to the BBC's Stephen Gibbs. In 1989, Colombia's Pablo Escobar was ranked the 7th richest man in the world, with $25bn to his name. Who says there are no job opportunities?

Why a federal judge ordered White House to restore Jim Acosta's press badge

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration likely violated the reporter's Fifth Amendment rights when it stripped his press credentials earlier this month.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 16: CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta (R) returns to the White House with CNN Washington bureau chief Sam Feist after Federal judge Timothy J. Kelly ordered the White House to reinstate his press pass November 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. CNN has filed a lawsuit against the White House after Acosta's press pass was revoked after a dispute involving a news conference last week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Acosta will be allowed to return to the White House on Friday.
  • The judge described the ruling as narrow, and didn't rule one way or the other on violations of the First Amendment.
  • The case is still open, and the administration may choose to appeal the ruling.
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How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
Strange Maps
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
  • Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America
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Scientists just voted to change the definition of a kilogram

The definition of a kilogram will now be fixed to Planck's constant, a fundamental part of quantum physics.

Greg L via Wikipedia
Surprising Science
  • The new definition of a kilogram is based on a physical constant in quantum physics.
  • Unlike the current definition of a kilogram, this measurement will never change.
  • Scientists also voted to update the definitions of several other measurements in physics.
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