Economics before romance: How marriage differs in poor countries

Economic concerns can take much of the sentimentality and romance out of marriage, says Judith Bruce, the senior associate and policy analyst at the Population Council.

Financial concerns can take much of the sentimentality and romance out of marriage, says Judith Bruce, the senior associate and policy analyst at the Population Council. In poorer countries especially, marriage becomes more of an arrangement by which women’s time, labor, and fertility are ceded as an essential economic exchange.

Other people are having way, way less sex than you think they are

As part of Ipsos’ long-running studies on misperceptions, researchers asked people in Britain and the U.S. to guess how often people aged 18-29 in their country had sex in the past four weeks.

Research shows we think young people have a lot more sex than they do in reality – and men have a particularly skewed view of the sex lives of young women.

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Eating more fish is linked to increased sex and pregnancy, study finds

Couples who had fish more than 8 times a menstrual cycle had a 47% shorter time getting pregnant than those who didn't, and had 22% more sex than those that didn't.

Fish. They swim around without emotion and, let's be honest, don't pay taxes. But according to a highly cited study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, they might be good for something after all: helping us humans procreate. 

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Following sex, some men have unexpected feelings – study

A new study shows that some men's reaction to sex is not what you'd expect, resulting in a condition previously observed in women.

Our culture tends not to trouble itself with how men feel after sex—it’s presumed that as the ultimate goal of much of male energy and desire, sex can only lead to feelings of pleasure. But a first-of-its-kind study found that men can get sad after sex, exhibiting a condition called “post-coital dysphoria” (PCD) that has previously been observed in women.

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Sorry, men, there’s no such thing as ‘dirt blindness’ – you just need to do more housework

While the gender gap is narrowing, women still do seven hours more housework per week than men (and that doesn’t include the child-caring).

The problem with housework is that it is never-ending drudgery. As soon as the floor is cleaned, the dog throws up, the kids spill slime ingredients into the wood grain, and the tradie walks through the house with well-oiled work boots. And the cycle begins again.

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