Travel Tales From the Blind Are Exciting, and Different

Illustrated travel stories told from the perspective of the blind and visually impaired.

Taking it all in
Taking it all in. (MAKOU0629)

Travel Supermarket recently compiled and illustrated some fascinating travel stories from people whose sensory experiences of the world are different from most people. We’ve written previously about blind woodworker and craftsman George Wurtzel, who puts it this way:


””Blind people experience a city a little different than sighted people. It is a whole body experience, the texture of the streets under your feet, the bumping and jostling of very crowded streets, the intense smells of food, beer, bakeries and perfumes. You gain snap shots of people based on their conversation. All of these things build a mental picture that is very close to what someone would get by looking around.”

These recollections offer the sighted a unique and refreshing perspective on the places they describe.

Woodworker and craftsman George Wurzel — blind since his teens

Mountains of North Carolina

gmwurtzel.com

Heavy equipment salesman Billy — legally blind from birth

Tokyo, Japan

Jazz vocalist Frank Senior — blind from birth

Adirondack Mountains, New York

franksenior.com

High-school graduate Ross Minor — blind since age 8

Grand Junction, Colorado

Unidentified Mind’s Eye Travel customer — visually impaired

Penobscot Bay, Maine

Mind’s Eye Travel organizes and hosts vacation travel for the blind and visually impaired.

Professional long distance hiker Trevor Thomas — blind since 2005

Mt.Elbert, Colorado

Writer and cook Christine Ha — blind

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Christine is the Season 3 winner of MasterChef U.S.

theblindcook.com

Film critic and video producer Tommy Edison — blind from birth

Melbourne, Australia

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