Travel Tales From the Blind Are Exciting, and Different

Illustrated travel stories told from the perspective of the blind and visually impaired.

Travel Supermarket recently compiled and illustrated some fascinating travel stories from people whose sensory experiences of the world are different from most people. We’ve written previously about blind woodworker and craftsman George Wurtzel, who puts it this way:


””Blind people experience a city a little different than sighted people. It is a whole body experience, the texture of the streets under your feet, the bumping and jostling of very crowded streets, the intense smells of food, beer, bakeries and perfumes. You gain snap shots of people based on their conversation. All of these things build a mental picture that is very close to what someone would get by looking around.”

These recollections offer the sighted a unique and refreshing perspective on the places they describe.

Woodworker and craftsman George Wurzel — blind since his teens

Mountains of North Carolina

gmwurtzel.com

Heavy equipment salesman Billy — legally blind from birth

Tokyo, Japan

Jazz vocalist Frank Senior — blind from birth

Adirondack Mountains, New York

franksenior.com

High-school graduate Ross Minor — blind since age 8

Grand Junction, Colorado

Unidentified Mind’s Eye Travel customer — visually impaired

Penobscot Bay, Maine

Mind’s Eye Travel organizes and hosts vacation travel for the blind and visually impaired.

Professional long distance hiker Trevor Thomas — blind since 2005

Mt.Elbert, Colorado

Writer and cook Christine Ha — blind

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Christine is the Season 3 winner of MasterChef U.S.

theblindcook.com

Film critic and video producer Tommy Edison — blind from birth

Melbourne, Australia

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

26 ultra-rich people own as much as the world's 3.8 billion poorest

The Oxfam report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency."

Getty Images and Wikimedia Commons
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report by Oxfam argues that wealth inequality is causing poverty and misery around the world.
  • In the last year, the world's billionaires saw their wealth increase by 12%, while the poorest 3.8 billion people on the planet lost 11% of their wealth.
  • The report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency." We explain what Steven Pinker's got to do with it.
Keep reading Show less

People who constantly complain are harmful to your health

Moans, groans, and gripes release stress hormones in the brain.

Photo credit: Getty Images / Stringer
popular

Could you give up complaining for a whole month? That's the crux of this interesting piece by Jessica Hullinger over at Fast Company. Hullinger explores the reasons why humans are so predisposed to griping and why, despite these predispositions, we should all try to complain less. As for no complaining for a month, that was the goal for people enrolled in the Complaint Restraint project.

Participants sought to go the entirety of February without so much as a moan, groan, or bellyache.

Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes.
  • Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that?
  • But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users.
Keep reading Show less