Re: What is the most important war in human history?

With respect for the prior question - in general terms any war that is historically recorded is important. We learn from history, no matter how biased or inexact it may be. Yet, it seems we never learn enough to understand that no war has ever resulted in the overview (justification for?) one side or the other subscribes too.


There cannot be "a most important war" decided; because we do not know the totality of any wars cause, impact or result. What was lost and/or gained, completely? Not just what is believed or selectively reported.

The sad thing is we might consider any war something to celebrate. This is done only when the misery and death accomplished is overlooked. Remember, the images we gain knowledge of during a conflict, the injury to mind, body and culture, too often shut away or edited from our societal mindfulness.

War is something to be rationalized, justified, while peace and respect-for-others is what is truly important. What is the most important peaceful outcome or continuance in human history?

connecttovalue@aol.com

Is life after 75 worth living? This UPenn scholar doubts it.

What makes a life worth living as you grow older?

Culture & Religion
  • Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel revisits his essay on wanting to die at 75 years old.
  • The doctor believes that an old life filled with disability and lessened activity isn't worth living.
  • Activists believe his argument stinks of ageism, while advances in biohacking could render his point moot.
Keep reading Show less

Brazil's Amazon fires: How they started — and how you can help.

The Amazon Rainforest is often called "The Planet's Lungs."

NASA
Politics & Current Affairs
  • For weeks, fires have been burning in the Amazon rainforest in Brazil, likely started by farmers and ranchers.
  • Brazil's president, Jair Bolsonaro, has blamed NGOs for starting the flames, offering no evidence to support the claim.
  • There are small steps you can take to help curb deforestation in the Amazon rainforest, which produces about 20 percent of the world's oxygen.
Keep reading Show less

Study: Sending emojis is linked to scoring more dates, sex

Emojis might contain more emotional information than meets the eye.

Pixabay
Sex & Relationships
  • A new study shows that people who frequently used emojis in text messages with potential dates engaged in more sexual activity and had more contact with those dates.
  • However, the study only shows an association; it didn't establish causality.
  • The authors suggest that emojis might help to convey nuanced emotional information that's lacking in strictly text-based messaging.
Keep reading Show less