Re: Re: Is climate change a human rights issue?

Climate change itself may not be a human rights issue -- though evidence seems to indicate that rich nations have created most of the problem, and poor ones will bear the brunt of the costs -- but the way wealthy countries choose to respond to global warming is certainly a rights issue.


Dire poverty and its symptoms -- disease, war, famine -- kill many more humans globally, today, than climate change potentially will in the future. In terms of saving human lives, we could do much more good by alleviating poverty now, especially with positive-sum solutions like free trade and immigration, than we could by making massive sacrifices today in order to forestall global warming and reap little potential benefit tomorrow. Further, once poor nations develop, there's evidence that they start taking care of the environment, too.

Forcing anyone -- but especially the poor -- to reduce emissions is a nasty practice that puts uneven values on the lives of rich and poor humans around the world.

3D printing might save your life one day. It's transforming medicine and health care.

What can 3D printing do for medicine? The "sky is the limit," says Northwell Health researcher Dr. Todd Goldstein.

Northwell Health
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Medical professionals are currently using 3D printers to create prosthetics and patient-specific organ models that doctors can use to prepare for surgery.
  • Eventually, scientists hope to print patient-specific organs that can be transplanted safely into the human body.
  • Northwell Health, New York State's largest health care provider, is pioneering 3D printing in medicine in three key ways.
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Big Think Edge
  • "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose," Sherlock Holmes famously remarked.
  • In this lesson, Maria Konnikova, author of Mastermind: How to think like Sherlock Holmes, teaches you how to optimize memory, Holmes style.
  • The goal is to expand one's limited "brain attic," so that what used to be a small space can suddenly become much larger because we are using the space more efficiently.

Active ingredient in Roundup found in 95% of studied beers and wines

The controversial herbicide is everywhere, apparently.

(MsMaria/Shutterstock)
Surprising Science
  • U.S. PIRG tested 20 beers and wines, including organics, and found Roundup's active ingredient in almost all of them.
  • A jury on August 2018 awarded a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma victim $289 million in Roundup damages.
  • Bayer/Monsanto says Roundup is totally safe. Others disagree.
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Big Think Edge
  • Our ability to behave rationally depends not just on our ability to use the facts, but on our ability to give those facts meaning. To be rational, we need both facts and feelings. We need to be subjective.
  • In this lesson, risk communication expert David Ropeik teaches you how human rationality influences our perception of risk.
  • By the end of it, you'll understand the pitfalls of your subjective risk perception system so that you can avoid these traps in the future.