Author Sara Zarr: Finding Inspiration in Failure

Author Sara Zarr has big ideas. Her books tackle huge themes with beautiful, realistic prose that cuts to the heart of her characters. Last week on author Nova Ren Suma’s blog, Zarr posted about what inspires her to write. 


You’d think she might be inspired by the fact that her first novel (Story of a Girl) was a nominee for the National Book Award, or that her fifth and most recent novel (How to Save a Life) was just named to the Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Books of 2011 list. 

Surprisingly, success isn’t what drives Sara Zarr to write. 

What’s the big idea that does inspire her?

Failure.

Zarr writes: 

I’m reminded that the point of creating isn’t control. 

The point isn’t saving yourself from embarrassment... 

The point isn’t avoiding failure.

We can’t. It’s inevitable. Those who finish what they start persevere through it, blow gently on those embers, tend to that first love...

Read her entire post here. Whether you’re creating books, balance sheets, or legal briefs, it’s a great way to start your week.

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