Powerful Gatekeepers are Taking Control of the Internet

The emergence of powerful internet institutions, particularly in the area of search and semantics, is subverting the once vaunted democracy of the internet.

Powerful Gatekeepers are Taking Control of the Internet

“Unfortunately, the promise of a free internet without gatekeepers is fast proving to be yet another mass delusion, a very potent opiate utilized by societal elites to appease the malcontents in society,  thereby suggesting that democracy exists where none can be found.


In fact, the internet today is dominated by powerful gatekeepers  and they utilize their increasing dominance either in service of promoting individuals/institutions, or ostracizing them. 

The most formidable gatekeeper happens to be Google, the internet colossus that  determines search result information concerning any topic.   No better example of Google’s power to censor or exclude can be found in the fact that Google search results concerning  any topic often are 50%-75% fewer in number than might be found on other comparable search engines.

Another notable gatekeeper is Wikipedia, comprised of volunteer 'experts' who collectively render judgments about who and what should matter in our world today.  Recently, Wikipedia formed a search result alliance with Google, thus further impairing the purported 'democracy' of the internet.  Ask the Church of Scientology about their feelings concerning internet freedom: when Wikipedia felt that info concerning the Church was excessively favorable, it simply  banned edits of the Scientology topic emanating from IP addresses thought to be associated with the  Church.   If that is not the reaction of a gatekeeper, then I need a refresher course in Semantics.

Essentially, in all matters pertaining to corporations, if it smells like a monopoly or oligopoly, then rest assured, it probably is.”

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