Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Google employees sign open letter demanding end to Project Dragonfly

Project Dragonfly aims to help the Chinese government build a censored search engine that would "blacklist" information that officials don't like.

(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
  • More than 80 employees have signed the letter so far.
  • The protest comes in the wake of Google employees protesting sexual misconduct within the company and Project Maven, in which Google was helping the U.S. government analyze military drone footage.
  • Google employees are planning walkouts over Project Dragonfly, according to reports.

Scores of Google employees have signed an open letter protesting Project Dragonfly, a controversial effort to build a censored search engine in China.

In early August, The Intercept revealed Google's plans to work with the Chinese government to create a search engine app that would "comply with the country's strict censorship laws, restricting access to content that Xi Jinping's Communist Party regime deems unfavorable." In other words, it would "blacklist" information about political opponents, free speech, sex, news, academic studies, and references to "anticommunism" and historical events like the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.

As of Tuesday, 84 employees had signed the letter that was posted to Medium. The employees wrote that they're not protesting China, but rather the establishment of a dangerous precedent that would "aid the powerful in oppressing the vulnerable, wherever they may be."

"Dragonfly in China would establish a dangerous precedent at a volatile political moment, one that would make it harder for Google to deny other countries similar concessions…Reports are already showing who bears the cost, including Uyghurs, women's rights advocates, and students. Providing the Chinese government with ready access to user data, as required by Chinese law, would make Google complicit in oppression and human rights abuses."

Google's recent controversies

In addition to Project Dragonfly, Google employees have in recent months protested the company's handling of sexual assault and harassment allegations, and also Project Maven, in which Google was helping the Department of Defense develop technology and practices to better analyze drone footage. Google said the project was intended to reduce civilian casualties.

"The technology is used to flag images for human review and is intended to save lives and save people from having to do highly tedious work," Google told The New York Times in April.

Both protests led to changes within the company: Google plans to end Project Maven in 2019, and the company updated its sexual misconduct policies after employees staged walkouts in several countries. According to an Engadget report, employees are planning more walkouts over Project Dragonfly.

"Don't be evil"

Google's motto was once "don't be evil," but the company removed nearly all mention of the phrase when it updated its code of conduct earlier this year. It did, however, leave one reference to the old motto in the last line of the document:

"And remember… don't be evil, and if you see something that you think isn't right – speak up!"

Neom, Saudi Arabia's $500 billion megacity, reaches its next phase

Construction of the $500 billion dollar tech city-state of the future is moving ahead.

Credit: Neom
Technology & Innovation
  • The futuristic megacity Neom is being built in Saudi Arabia.
  • The city will be fully automated, leading in health, education and quality of life.
  • It will feature an artificial moon, cloud seeding, robotic gladiators and flying taxis.
Keep reading Show less

Better reskilling can future-proof jobs in the age of automation. Enter SkillUp's new coalition.

Coronavirus layoffs are a glimpse into our automated future. We need to build better education opportunities now so Americans can find work in the economy of tomorrow.

Image: metamorworks / Shutterstock
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Outplacement is an underperforming $5 billion dollar industry. A new non-profit coalition by SkillUp intends to disrupt it.
  • More and more Americans will be laid off in years to come due to automation. Those people need to reorient their career paths and reskill in a way that protects their long-term livelihood.
  • SkillUp brings together technology and service providers, education and training providers, hiring employers, worker outreach, and philanthropies to help people land in-demand jobs in high-growth industries.
Keep reading Show less

Do we really date based on our own ideals?

Do we really know what we want in a romantic partner? If so, do our desires actually mean we match up with people who suit them?

Does what we want in a partner really match up with what we look for?

Photo by Nejron Photo on Shutterstock
Sex & Relationships
  • Two separate scientific studies suggest that our "ideals" don't really match what we look for in a romantic partner.
  • Results of studies like these can change the way we date, especially in the online world.
  • "You say you want these three attributes and you like the people who possess these attributes. But the story doesn't end there," says Paul Eastwick, co-author of the study and professor in the UC Davis Department of Psychology.
Keep reading Show less
Gear

These 7 items make working remotely more efficient and effective

Workers are adjusting to their new employment reality on couches and kitchen tables across the nation.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast