Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Michigan becomes first U.S. state to ban sale of flavored e-cigarettes

The move comes amid a surge of vaping-related hospitalizations.

  • Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said businesses will have 30 days to comply with the new policy.
  • The ban only applies to flavored e-cigarettes, which some consider to be especially appealing to young people.
  • The CDC and FDA are investigating a recent surge in vaping-related hospitalizations, most of which seem to have been caused by black-market vape products.


Michigan plans to become the first U.S. state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced Wednesday in a move that comes amid growing concern over the dangers of vaping.

Brick-and-mortar stores and online vendors will have 30 days to comply with the ban, which is set to last six months with an option to renew. The governor also ordered the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to "ban misleading marketing of vaping products, including the use of terms like 'clean,' 'safe,' and 'healthy' that perpetuate beliefs that these products are harmless."

"As governor, my number one priority is keeping our kids safe," Whitmer said in a statement. "And right now, companies selling vaping products are using candy flavors to hook children on nicotine and misleading claims to promote the belief that these products are safe. That ends today."

In another statement, the CEO of the American Heart Association, Nancy Brown, supported the ban, and cited a recent surge of vaping-related hospitalizations, which are still being investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration. At least two people have recently died after vaping.

"We know shockingly little about the health impact of e-cigarettes being widely marketed to youth and adults," Brown said. "The recent outbreak of respiratory illnesses associated with e-cigarette use has only added to the uncertainty and increased the need for immediate action."


"We know shockingly little about the health impact of e-cigarettes being widely marketed to youth and adults," Brown said. "The recent outbreak of respiratory illnesses associated with e-cigarette use has only added to the uncertainty and increased the need for immediate action."

Michigan is set to ban only flavored e-cigarettes, which some consider to be especially appealing to young people. But flavor is also seen as helpful in convincing traditional smokers to switch to vaping, which — though clearly bad for — seems to be healthier than combustible cigarettes. Or, a better way of looking at it is that it's the lesser of two evils, seeing as a growing body of research is steadily revealing that e-cigarettes can damage the heart, cardiovascular cells, and lungs.

The recent vaping-related hospitalizations and deaths are the most concerning. But many of these cases seem to be caused by black-market vape juices — some of which purport to contain THC (the main psychoactive component in marijuana) — that contain contaminants or adulterants, and are sold on the street or in "pop-up shops," according to a recent report from The Washington Post. It seems unlikely that mainstream products from big e-cigarettes companies, such as Juul, are responsible for the hospitalizations.

"What's likely causing the harm is something that they are putting in to make it easy or cheap to mix," former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told The Post.

Still, it remains unclear whether alarm from these recent cases, combined with a body research that continues to illuminate the health effects of conventional vaping products, will influence other states to follow Michigan's path toward stricter regulation.

Is the universe a graveyard? This theory suggests humanity may be alone.

Ever since we've had the technology, we've looked to the stars in search of alien life. It's assumed that we're looking because we want to find other life in the universe, but what if we're looking to make sure there isn't any?

According to the Great Filter theory, Earth might be one of the only planets with intelligent life. And that's a good thing (NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team [STScI/AURA]).
Surprising Science

Here's an equation, and a rather distressing one at that: N = R* × fP × ne × f1 × fi × fc × L. It's the Drake equation, and it describes the number of alien civilizations in our galaxy with whom we might be able to communicate. Its terms correspond to values such as the fraction of stars with planets, the fraction of planets on which life could emerge, the fraction of planets that can support intelligent life, and so on. Using conservative estimates, the minimum result of this equation is 20. There ought to be 20 intelligent alien civilizations in the Milky Way that we can contact and who can contact us. But there aren't any.

Keep reading Show less

Study details the negative environmental impact of online shopping

Frequent shopping for single items adds to our carbon footprint.

A truck pulls out of a large Walmart regional distribution center on June 6, 2019 in Washington, Utah.

Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new study shows e-commerce sites like Amazon leave larger greenhouse gas footprints than retail stores.
  • Ordering online from retail stores has an even smaller footprint than going to the store yourself.
  • Greening efforts by major e-commerce sites won't curb wasteful consumer habits. Consolidating online orders can make a difference.
Keep reading Show less

Childhood sleeping problems may signal mental disorders later in life

Chronic irregular sleep in children was associated with psychotic experiences in adolescence, according to a recent study out of the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology.

A girl and her mother take an afternoon nap in bed.

Personal Growth
  • We spend 40 percent of our childhoods asleep, a time for cognitive growth and development.
  • A recent study found an association between irregular sleep patterns in childhood and either psychotic experiences or borderline personality disorder during teenage years.
  • The researchers hope their findings can help identify at-risk youth to improve early intervention.
  • Keep reading Show less
    Videos

    Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

    Are we genetically inclined for superstition or just fearful of the truth?

    Scroll down to load more…
    Quantcast