Gallup: Americans’ pride in U.S. hits record low

Less than 50 percent of Americans say they're "extremely proud" to be American.

  • Gallup has conducted its American pride survey since 2001.
  • Democrats — but not Republicans — reported significant drops in American pride compared to recent years, while independents reported minor drops.
  • Despite the diminished pride, President Donald Trump has ordered what will surely be one of the largest Independence Day celebrations Washington D.C. has even seen.


Americans' pride in the U.S. is at its lowest point since 2001, according to a new Gallup survey.

For the survey, Gallup conducted telephone interviews between June 3 to 16, 2019, with a random sample of 1,015 adults across all 50 states. The surveyors asked respondents to rate their pride in the U.S. — both overall and in specific national domains, such as the U.S. military, scientific achievements, and political system.

Overall, 70 percent of Americans say they're proud to be American, while less than half (45 percent) say they're "extremely proud" to be American, marking the second year in a row this measure fell below majority level.

"The highest readings on the measure, 69 percent and 70 percent, were between 2002 and 2004, after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, when the American public expressed high levels of patriotism and rallied around the U.S. government," Gallup staff wrote. "Yet, since the start of George W. Bush's second presidential term in 2005, fewer than 60 percent of Americans have expressed extreme pride in being American."

American pride differs by age, political affiliation

Democrats — who have historically self-reported less pride in the U.S. compared to Republicans — showed the lowest reading of "extremely proud" to be American since Gallup began the survey 19 years ago. Meanwhile, the share of Republicans who are "extremely proud" in the U.S. has been rising since 2016 — climbing from 68 percent to 76 percent in 2019.

The results also show that women, liberals and younger adults expressed the lowest pride.

Gallup's 2019 survey is its first to include a question measuring American pride in eight aspects of U.S. government and society.

"Strong majorities express pride in six of the eight -- American scientific achievements (91%), the U.S. military (89%), American culture and arts (85%), economic (75%) and sporting (73%) achievements, and diversity in race, ethnic background, and religion (72%)."

American pride might be diminished, but the country's Independence Day celebration in Washington, D.C. is set to be one of the biggest – and potentially the most controversial and expensive – in U.S. history.

Befriend your ideological opposite. It’s fun.

Step inside the unlikely friendship of a former ACLU president and an ultra-conservative Supreme Court Justice.

Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Former president of the ACLU Nadine Strossen and Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia were unlikely friends. They debated each other at events all over the world, and because of that developed a deep and rewarding friendship – despite their immense differences.
  • Scalia, a famous conservative, was invited to circles that were not his "home territory", such as the ACLU, to debate his views. Here, Strossen expresses her gratitude and respect for his commitment to the exchange of ideas.
  • "It's really sad that people seem to think that if you disagree with somebody on some issues you can't be mutually respectful, you can't enjoy each other's company, you can't learn from each other and grow in yourself," says Strossen.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.
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