Republicans face growing pressure to delay ​Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote

On Sunday, a woman accused the Supreme Court nominee of sexual assault in an interview with the Washington Post.

  • The woman claims Kavanaugh drunkenly forced himself on her in the early 1980s.
  • Democrats hope to delay the confirmation vote, which is scheduled for Thursday.
  • A delay could possibly push the vote until after the midterms, when Democrats could potentially overtake the senate.
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For the 99%, the lines are getting blurry

Infographics show the classes and anxieties in the supposedly classless U.S. economy.

For those of us who follow politics, we’re used to commentators referring to the President’s low approval rating as a surprise given the U.S.'s “booming” economy. This seeming disconnect, however, should really prompt us to reconsider the measurements by which we assess the health of an economy. With a robust U.S. stock market and GDP and low unemployment figures, it’s easy to see why some think all is well. But looking at real U.S. wages, which have remained stagnant—and have, thus, in effect gone down given rising costs from inflation—a very different picture emerges. For the 1%, the economy is booming. For the rest of us, it’s hard to even know where we stand. A recent study by Porch (a home-improvement company) of blue-collar vs. white-collar workers shows how traditional categories are becoming less distinct—the study references "new-collar" workers, who require technical certifications but not college degrees. And a set of recent infographics from CreditLoan capturing the thoughts of America’s middle class as defined by the Pew Research Center shows how confused we are.

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Coparenting: A lifestyle innovation from our broke middle class

Economic necessity and growing isolation are making some middle-class families try coparenting, explains author Alissa Quart.

Economic necessity and growing isolation are making some middle-class families try coparenting, explains author Alissa Quart. Is the practice of sharing living spaces and parenting responsibilities across families a depressing trend or a "revolutionary" adaptation?

OxyContin maker patents new drug that helps addicts wean off opioids

The maker of OxyContin, one of the world's most widely abused opioids, has patented a drug that aims to help addicts wean off opioids.

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Political outrage: Why all sides get it wrong about the arc of history

Is there an arc to history? The danger that we’re in right now in the U.S. is that we’re shifting from a politics of inevitability to a politics of eternity, which affects how we view history, believes historian Timothy Snyder.

Is there an arc to history? The danger that we’re in right now in the U.S. is that we’re shifting from a politics of inevitability to a politics of eternity, believes historian Timothy Snyder. That means whether we want to or not, America is moving squarely back into history, when anything can happen. Europe too has its own politics of inevitability to deal with, as the idea of the European Union implies believing in history that simply never happened.