How to make sure you stay on track with your goals

Setting goals might be easy, but sticking to them? That's when it gets tough.

We all have a list of goals — either written down or floating around in our heads — that will help take our lives in the direction we want.


Having that list is a great first step, but you have to actually keep track of, and then follow through on your goals in order to make them count.

Major behavior changes don't happen overnight — you're far more likely to succeed if you use Microsteps (small, science-backed incremental changes) that can make a big difference. Here are three additional strategies to help you stick to your goals so you can achieve them:

Find people who will keep you accountable

You might be hesitant to share your goals with other people. After all, if you let others know about your goals and then end up not being able to achieve them, you may feel as though you've failed. But in reality, telling people about your goals and asking them to hold you accountable actually helps. And it can be a two-way street: Return the favor by finding an accountability buddy, and you can each help each other stay on track.

Do a distraction detox

If you're finding that you are not reaching your goals because instead of chipping away at them, you're constantly turning to technology or devices when you have some downtime, consider trying a distraction detox. As Thrive founder and CEO Arianna Huffington writes: "We're being controlled by something we should be controlling. And it's consuming our attention and crippling our ability to focus, think, be present, and, most important, to truly connect, both with others and with ourselves."

Of course, technology can be very useful and, in some ways, make us more efficient. Huffington is simply urging us to reconsider our relationship with our devices — disconnecting from them when needed, and reconnecting with ourselves, and in turn, our goals. For example, if your goal is to get better at drawing, instead of spending an hour each night watching TV or scrolling through social media, use that time to draw instead.

Give yourself time off

Being disciplined is a great thing (and a vital way of reaching your goals), but don't forget to take the time you need to relax, reset, and recharge. Meeting your goals will be impossible if you're burned out. Instead, give yourself some time off for good behavior. Take a break from your environment, spend some time in nature, or spend an hour wandering through a nearby museum. Allowing yourself time to do something other than work towards your goals is healthy and necessary. It may also spark curiosity and creativity, and make you even more productive than before when you're ready to refocus.

Reprinted with permission of Thrive Global. Read the original article.

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  • Domino's partnered with the Silicon Valley startup Nuro to have robot cars deliver pizza.
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Would you have to tip robots? You might be answering that question sooner than you think as Domino's is about to start using robots for delivering pizza. Later this year a fleet of self-driving robotic vehicles will be spreading the joy of pizza throughout the Houston area for the famous pizza manufacturer, using delivery cars made by the Silicon Valley startup Nuro.

The startup, founded by Google veterans, raised $940 million in February and has already been delivering groceries for Kroger around Houston. Partnering with the pizza juggernaut Domino's, which delivers close to 3 million pizzas a day, is another logical step for the expanding drone car business.

Kevin Vasconi of Domino's explained in a press release that they see these specially-designed robots as "a valuable partner in our autonomous vehicle journey," adding "The opportunity to bring our customers the choice of an unmanned delivery experience, and our operators an additional delivery solution during a busy store rush, is an important part of our autonomous vehicle testing."

How will they work exactly? Nuro explained in its own press release that this "opportunity to use Nuro's autonomous delivery" will be available for some of the customers who order online. Once they opt in, they'll be able to track the car via an app. When the vehicle gets to them, the customers will use a special PIN code to unlock the pizza compartment.

Nuro and its competitors Udelv and Robomart have been focusing specifically on developing such "last-mile product delivery" machines, reports Arstechnica. Their specially-made R1 vehicle is about half the size of a regular passenger car and doesn't offer any room for a driver. This makes it safer and lighter too, with less potential to cause harm in case of an accident. It also sticks to a fairly low speed of under 25 miles an hour and slams on the breaks at the first sign of trouble.

What also helps such robot cars is "geofencing" technology which confines them to a limited area surrounding the store.

For now, the cars are still tracked around the neighborhoods by human-driven vehicles, with monitors to make sure nothing goes haywire. But these "chase cars" should be phased out eventually, an important milestone in the evolution of your robot pizza drivers.

Check out how Nuro's vehicles work: