Why avoiding logical fallacies is an everyday superpower

Ten of the most sandbagging, red-herring, and effective logical fallacies.

Why avoiding logical fallacies is an everyday superpower
Photo credit: Miguel Henriques on Unsplash
  • Many an otherwise-worthwhile argument has been derailed by logical fallacies.
  • Sometimes these fallacies are deliberate tricks, and sometimes just bad reasoning.
  • Avoiding these traps makes disgreeing so much better.

Logical-fallacy traps are all around us, and we get caught in them all the time. They trap us during discussions — okay, arguments — and make our heads want to burst. Sometimes we get derailed while we're trying to sort out important issues, and sometimes it's simply trying to adjudicate day-to-day nonsense.

Nonetheless, getting thrown off course by one of these fallacies is like becoming ensnared in vines from which escape grows ever thornier. What a superpower it would be then, to be able to smash right though these binds — or even better, to learn how to sidestep them in the first place.

There's a chart floating around online from non-profit School of Thought, and it sums up the most pernicious logical fallacies. (You can buy the chart as a wall poster from their shop.) It's a great way to develop your debating superpowers. We thought we'd share 10 of our favorites.

1. Composition/division fallacies

This is a twofer originally courtesy of Aristotle. The Logical Place describes them this way: "The Fallacy of Composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that it is true of some part of the whole. Conversely, the Fallacy of Division occurs when one infers that something true for the whole must also be true of all or some of its parts."

An example of the Composition form:

  • A is a teacher
  • A has a mustache
  • All teachers have mustaches

For the Division version, if A has no whiskers, all teachers are clean-lipped.

2. The Tu quoque fallacy

You know this one, the equivalent of, "Oh, yeah? Well, you, too." According to the site Logically Fallacious, it's defined as: "Claiming the argument is flawed by pointing out that the one making the argument is not acting consistently with the claims of the argument." What did your parents say about two wrongs?

3. The Texas sharpshooter fallacy

The validity of your argument appears to be based on evidence, but, as Your Logical Fallacy puts it, "You cherry-picked a data cluster to suit your argument, or found a pattern to fit a presumption." Nice try, though.

4. Ambiguity fallacy

Ambiguity's described on Your Logical Fallacy, thusly: "You used a double meaning or ambiguity of language to mislead or misrepresent the truth." The Fallacy Files has a great breakdown of Bill Clinton's denial of sexual congress with Monica Lewinsky, and why it was less than convincing to anyone really paying attention, even though he didn't exactly lie. The moral: Listen to what's being said by politicians and other salespeople very, very carefully.

5. Personal incredulity fallacy

According to Truly Fallacious, this one involves "Asserting because one finds something difficult to understand it can't be true." It's the raison d'être of climate-change deniers, and, yes, flat-Earthers.

6. Genetic fallacy

The Genetic fallacy is the one that causes you to discard, or accept, the validity of an argument due to its source. As far as the former goes, remember, "Even a broken clock is right twice a day." Consider the premise, not its speaker. As far as the latter goes, check out these examples from Soft Schools.

7. Middle ground fallacy

While middle ground — AKA compromise — can often be the solution to an impasse, it's not to say that it reveals some new, truer truth. In fact, it's just an agreement for both sides to live with being a little unhappy in order to move forward. Don't be bluffed out of your position by someone claiming they're meeting you halfway only in order to move you off a correct position you shouldn't abandon.

8. Anecdotal fallacy

"Everyone think this!" What this statement really means is that, in your limited personal experience, something is true. Fallacy Files has a nice way of putting it: "The Anecdotal Fallacy is committed when a recent memory, a striking anecdote, or a news story of an unusual event leads one to overestimate the probability of that type of event, especially when one has access to better evidence."

9. False cause fallacy

Your Logical Fallacy offers this: "You presumed that a real or perceived relationship between things means that one is the cause of the other." This is the old correlation-does-not-equal-causation fallacy that's so easy to fall into.

10. The fallacy fallacy

There's a mighty big difference between good, sound reasons and reason that sound good." — Burton Hillis

The perfect place to conclude this list. Remember, just because someone's argument depends on a fallacy doesn't necessarily mean they're wrong. As Fallacy Files drily warns, "Like anything else, the concept of logical fallacy can be misunderstood and misused, and can even become a source of fallacious reasoning." Keep an open mind and think about what the other person is saying — you want to glimpse the truth, or not, behind their mental and verbal parlor tricks.

Caution, superperson

"With great power comes great responsibility." This advice is not just for Spiderman. Use your new superpower wisely — other people fall for these tricks, too. Which is to say, play nice.

Golden blood: The rarest blood in the world

We explore the history of blood types and how they are classified to find out what makes the Rh-null type important to science and dangerous for those who live with it.

What is the rarest blood type?

Abid Katib/Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • Fewer than 50 people worldwide have 'golden blood' — or Rh-null.
  • Blood is considered Rh-null if it lacks all of the 61 possible antigens in the Rh system.
  • It's also very dangerous to live with this blood type, as so few people have it.
Keep reading Show less

China's "artificial sun" sets new record for fusion power

China has reached a new record for nuclear fusion at 120 million degrees Celsius.

Credit: STR via Getty Images
Technology & Innovation

This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink.

China wants to build a mini-star on Earth and house it in a reactor. Many teams across the globe have this same bold goal --- which would create unlimited clean energy via nuclear fusion.

But according to Chinese state media, New Atlas reports, the team at the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has set a new world record: temperatures of 120 million degrees Celsius for 101 seconds.

Yeah, that's hot. So what? Nuclear fusion reactions require an insane amount of heat and pressure --- a temperature environment similar to the sun, which is approximately 150 million degrees C.

If scientists can essentially build a sun on Earth, they can create endless energy by mimicking how the sun does it.

If scientists can essentially build a sun on Earth, they can create endless energy by mimicking how the sun does it. In nuclear fusion, the extreme heat and pressure create a plasma. Then, within that plasma, two or more hydrogen nuclei crash together, merge into a heavier atom, and release a ton of energy in the process.

Nuclear fusion milestones: The team at EAST built a giant metal torus (similar in shape to a giant donut) with a series of magnetic coils. The coils hold hot plasma where the reactions occur. They've reached many milestones along the way.

According to New Atlas, in 2016, the scientists at EAST could heat hydrogen plasma to roughly 50 million degrees C for 102 seconds. Two years later, they reached 100 million degrees for 10 seconds.

The temperatures are impressive, but the short reaction times, and lack of pressure are another obstacle. Fusion is simple for the sun, because stars are massive and gravity provides even pressure all over the surface. The pressure squeezes hydrogen gas in the sun's core so immensely that several nuclei combine to form one atom, releasing energy.

But on Earth, we have to supply all of the pressure to keep the reaction going, and it has to be perfectly even. It's hard to do this for any length of time, and it uses a ton of energy. So the reactions usually fizzle out in minutes or seconds.

Still, the latest record of 120 million degrees and 101 seconds is one more step toward sustaining longer and hotter reactions.

Why does this matter? No one denies that humankind needs a clean, unlimited source of energy.

We all recognize that oil and gas are limited resources. But even wind and solar power --- renewable energies --- are fundamentally limited. They are dependent upon a breezy day or a cloudless sky, which we can't always count on.

Nuclear fusion is clean, safe, and environmentally sustainable --- its fuel is a nearly limitless resource since it is simply hydrogen (which can be easily made from water).

With each new milestone, we are creeping closer and closer to a breakthrough for unlimited, clean energy.

The science of sex, love, attraction, and obsession

The symbol for love is the heart, but the brain may be more accurate.

Videos
  • How love makes us feel can only be defined on an individual basis, but what it does to the body, specifically the brain, is now less abstract thanks to science.
  • One of the problems with early-stage attraction, according to anthropologist Helen Fisher, is that it activates parts of the brain that are linked to drive, craving, obsession, and motivation, while other regions that deal with decision-making shut down.
  • Dr. Fisher, professor Ted Fischer, and psychiatrist Gail Saltz explain the different types of love, explore the neuroscience of love and attraction, and share tips for sustaining relationships that are healthy and mutually beneficial.

Sex & Relationships

There never was a male fertility crisis

A new study suggests that reports of the impending infertility of the human male are greatly exaggerated.

Quantcast