6 creative ways that powerful people manage stress

We can all learn from these tips from Brad Pitt, Anne Hathaway, and more.

Anne Hathaway has just revealed her unique approach for tackling stress and anxiety. "Set a timer on your phone, have a candle nearby, and write it all down…You spew it all out. You do not read it…The timer goes off, you tear it out of the book, and you light it on fire," she told Town & Country. She recommends pouring your stresses out onto the page for 12 minutes before putting down your pen.


Even if you'd prefer not to actually set your journal entry ablaze, Hathaway's strategy does show the utility of physically getting your stresses out of sight.

And Hathaway isn't the only one with creative strategies for handling stress — here are some smart tips from other stars on the topic.

Lili Reinhart looks to the calming power of the beach

The Riverdale actress told Imagista, "I try to spend as much time with my family and close friends, I go to the beach a lot, sometimes even by myself. The world is overwhelming a lot of the times and I find myself to be an anxious person. I get stressed out and overwhelmed so I find it therapeutic to be at the beach." Spending time in nature is, in fact, a productive way to unwind.

Kerry Washington believes in the power of optimism

The actress told ESSENCE about her strategy for moving forward through difficult times: "No matter how bad things are — whether it was the period when I first sought out treatment for my eating disorder or when my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer or when the engagement dissolved — I know the other side is going to be better. Maybe even miraculously better. I hold on to that."

Brad Pitt re-focuses on his favorite hobby

The actor told PARADE that his love of architecture can ease his mind — showing the power of beloved activities. "If I have something that I'm dealing with that's causing me a lot of stress, my mind goes to architecture. I walk around the yard and start thinking about what I need to do to the house structurally. It's similar to puzzles in that way, like a crossword puzzle or anything else I can put my mind into. It's a relief for me," he said.

Zendaya turns to her "coloring station"

The actress tweeted about how coloring helps her manage stress, writing, "I literally have a coloring station at my house, in my house we all find it quite therapeutic. It helps me with stress."

Courtesy of Twitter

Research also backs Zendaya's playful approach — coloring has been found to reduce stress and anxiety.

Michelle Obama hits the gym

The former First Lady told Marie Claire that working out is a great outlet for her when she feels like she's under a lot of pressure. "Exercise is really important to me — it's therapeutic. So if I'm ever feeling tense or stressed or like I'm about to have a meltdown, I'll put on my iPod and head to the gym or out on a bike ride along Lake Michigan with the girls," she said.

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Reprinted with permission of Thrive Global. Read the original article.

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