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Why Crawling Like a Toddler Might Be the Best New Exercise Trend in Ages

Fitness experts are praising the benefits of crawling. 

Fitness crazes come and go, often involving special equipment and strange diets. But a new approach that’s gaining popularity is something anyone can relate to. It involves crawling. Yes, the kind of crawling on all fours you used to do as a child. 


Already popularized in physical therapy, crawling has been gaining traction to increase strength and fitness in the U.S. as well as in China.

Why does it work? 

"You can crawl in many ways. You can crawl on your hands and knees. You can also prop up on your toes and just hover, one or two inches above the ground, which is really going to pull in those core muscles and work those muscles effectively," said Danielle Johnson, a physical therapist at Minnesota’s Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. "Then, as you start to move, you're working on your shoulder girdle, you're working on your hips. If I could give one exercise to almost everybody, this would be it."

The popularization of such an unexpected exercise comes courtesy of the “Original Strength Training System,” whose expressed purpose is to make people “reset their operating system using a way they already know, one which we all used early in our lives”. 

How do people crawling in a hallway look like? Here’s an Instagram peek from the Original Strength folks:

Just a little sneak peak into a movement snack at @strengthmatters today. Instead of being on our butts all day, we've been getting up and pressing reset to keep us focused, energized and feeling good! #pressreset #originalstrength #idigthis #smile #play

A video posted by Original Strength (@original_strength) on Oct 2, 2016 at 10:51am PDT

The “new normal” paradox: What COVID-19 has revealed about higher education

Higher education faces challenges that are unlike any other industry. What path will ASU, and universities like ASU, take in a post-COVID world?

Photo: Luis Robayo/AFP via Getty Images
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Everywhere you turn, the idea that coronavirus has brought on a "new normal" is present and true. But for higher education, COVID-19 exposes a long list of pernicious old problems more than it presents new problems.
  • It was widely known, yet ignored, that digital instruction must be embraced. When combined with traditional, in-person teaching, it can enhance student learning outcomes at scale.
  • COVID-19 has forced institutions to understand that far too many higher education outcomes are determined by a student's family income, and in the context of COVID-19 this means that lower-income students, first-generation students and students of color will be disproportionately afflicted.
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Mystery effect speeds up the universe – not dark energy, says study

Russian astrophysicists propose the Casimir Effect causes the universe's expansion to accelerate.

Black hole accretion disk visualization.

Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Jeremy Schnittman
Surprising Science
  • Astrophysicists from Russia propose a theory that says dark energy doesn't exist.
  • Instead, the scientists think the Casimir Effect creates repulsion.
  • This effect causes the expansion of the universe to accelerate.
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Live on Tuesday | Personal finance in the COVID-19 era

Sallie Krawcheck and Bob Kulhan will be talking money, jobs, and how the pandemic will disproportionally affect women's finances.

How DNA revealed the woolly mammoth's fate – and what it teaches us today

Scientists uncovered the secrets of what drove some of the world's last remaining woolly mammoths to extinction.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Surprising Science

Every summer, children on the Alaskan island of St Paul cool down in Lake Hill, a crater lake in an extinct volcano – unaware of the mysteries that lie beneath.

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