Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

No Biggie, Neil deGrasse Tyson proposed a new kind of government

Neil deGrasse Tyson proposed an ideal form of government and caused a viral debate.

Neil deGrasse Tyson

After the tumultuous election year America had, the debate over what kind of leaders we want to represent us did not end. Helpful to the discussion are ideas by the famous astrophysist and speaker Neil deGrasse Tyson who in 2016 tweeted his thoughts on an ideal form of government:

Earth needs a virtual country: #Rationalia, with a one-line Constitution: All policy shall be based on the weight of evidence

Tyson's viral tweet was generally received with mixed emotions as people weren't sure how "Rationalia" would work and immediately saw some kind of fascist regime with eugenics on its mind. Or maybe something with communist underpinnings. Much of the doubt stemmed from the lack of confidence in the basic rationality of our species.

Presumably, Tyson does not see it that way and simply wants a government that is based on scientific evidence and reason.

In Tyson's videos for BigThink, he touches upon several topics relevant to this discussion. Here he talks about the intersection of science and faith:

If you dissect the tweet further, you can notice that he's calling for Earth to have a “virtual country" with an evidence-based directive in its constitution. Perhaps, he's not saying this should be the only country in existence but it may be a sort of affiliation for all rational people (whatever physical country they might actually inhabit). This could lead to an interesting, internet-based experiment.

To further bolster the case for Rationalia, Tyson already recruited some of its first citizens. Namely, a host of famous "rational" people like Richard Dawkins and Brian Greene.

What, in particular, does Tyson like about rationality?

He goes into more detail in the video below. As he says towards its end (around 8:28) - it is unstable to build a government on a belief system. Religion or matters of belief or disbelief in provable issues (like the mountain of data suggesting climate change), do not have a place in government.

Tyson says:

What you want is objectively verifiable truths, that we can all agree - that's what you build your economic system on, your government system.

And if you wouldn't mind having a President Tyson, you might want to check out his views on why STEM is important in boosting America:

Live on Tuesday | Personal finance in the COVID-19 era

Sallie Krawcheck and Bob Kulhan will be talking money, jobs, and how the pandemic will disproportionally affect women's finances.

Leonardo da Vinci could visually flip between dimensions, neuroscientist claims

A neuroscientist argues that da Vinci shared a disorder with Picasso and Rembrandt.

Christopher Tyler
Mind & Brain
  • A neuroscientist at the City University of London proposes that Leonardo da Vinci may have had exotropia, allowing him to see the world with impaired depth perception.
  • If true, it means that Da Vinci would have been able to see the images he wanted to paint as they would have appeared on a flat surface.
  • The finding reminds us that sometimes looking at the world in a different way can have fantastic results.
Keep reading Show less

Women who go to church have more kids—and more help

Want help raising your kids? Spend more time at church, says new study.

Youny children in monastic robes

Pixabay
Culture & Religion
  • Religious people tend to have more children than secular people, but why remains unknown.
  • A new study suggests that the social circles provided by regular church going make raising kids easier.
  • Conversely, having a large secular social group made women less likely to have children.
Keep reading Show less

Bubonic plague case reported in China

Health officials in China reported that a man was infected with bubonic plague, the infectious disease that caused the Black Death.

Vials Of Bacteria That May Cause Plague Missing From TX University

(Photo by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Getty Images)
Coronavirus
  • The case was reported in the city of Bayannur, which has issued a level-three plague prevention warning.
  • Modern antibiotics can effectively treat bubonic plague, which spreads mainly by fleas.
  • Chinese health officials are also monitoring a newly discovered type of swine flu that has the potential to develop into a pandemic virus.
Keep reading Show less
Future of Learning

Education vs. learning: How semantics can trigger a mind shift

The word "learning" opens up space for more people, places, and ideas.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast