Our future will be wireless, paperless, and cashless.

Where are the flying cars? \n\nHaving been born in the 1960s and watched all the Apollo moon landings, the one prediction of the future I recall best is that we would all be commuting in cars that flew. No more traffic jams. No more toll roads. Perhaps they all had small nuclear reactors in them so there was no need for gas or any other fuel. The plan was for The Jetsons to look like a reality TV show.\n\nAlmost 40 years since man first landed on the moon, my car is still permanently land-based; I still pay tolls; and I’m still filling it with gas. What did the promised transportation revolution delivered instead? The Segway. The company first marketed itself as "the next generation in personal mobility," which apparently meant traveling at about 12.5 miles (20 km) per hour with a range of 24 miles (38 km) before you had to re-charge the lithium-ion battery packs. As revolutionary as The Jetsons? This can’t even compete with the Batmobile. \n\nThe inventor of the Segway, Dean Kamen, once predicted that, "the Segway will be to the car what the car was to the horse and buggy." I remember the buzz that the Segway would mean the end to walking. It is hard to support the idea that the next transportation revolution should be the end of walking. \n\nDean Kamen is a smart guy – certainly smarter than I am. But the Segway was obviously designed in vacuum; devoid of consumer input. The "if you build it, they will come" model of product development – focused on engineering rather than consumer research – is based on hope and, as the cliché goes, hope is not a strategy. So I hope to contrast my ideas – whether you think they are any good or not – with those of engineers, like Kamen. Since I’m certainly not an engineer, I consider myself instead a technologist, which I define like this: the optimist sees the glass half full; the pessimist sees the glass half empty; and the technologist wonders why the engineer didn’t talk to anyone before building a glass that was twice as large as anyone wanted or needed.\n

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

4 reasons Martin Luther King, Jr. fought for universal basic income

In his final years, Martin Luther King, Jr. become increasingly focused on the problem of poverty in America.

(Photo by J. Wilds/Keystone/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Despite being widely known for his leadership role in the American civil rights movement, Martin Luther King, Jr. also played a central role in organizing the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.
  • The campaign was one of the first to demand a guaranteed income for all poor families in America.
  • Today, the idea of a universal basic income is increasingly popular, and King's arguments in support of the policy still make a good case some 50 years later.
Keep reading Show less

Why avoiding logical fallacies is an everyday superpower

10 of the most sandbagging, red-herring, and effective logical fallacies.

Photo credit: Miguel Henriques on Unsplash
Personal Growth
  • Many an otherwise-worthwhile argument has been derailed by logical fallacies.
  • Sometimes these fallacies are deliberate tricks, and sometimes just bad reasoning.
  • Avoiding these traps makes disgreeing so much better.
Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes.
  • Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that?
  • But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users.
Keep reading Show less