Our future will be wireless, paperless, and cashless.

Where are the flying cars? \n\nHaving been born in the 1960s and watched all the Apollo moon landings, the one prediction of the future I recall best is that we would all be commuting in cars that flew. No more traffic jams. No more toll roads. Perhaps they all had small nuclear reactors in them so there was no need for gas or any other fuel. The plan was for The Jetsons to look like a reality TV show.\n\nAlmost 40 years since man first landed on the moon, my car is still permanently land-based; I still pay tolls; and I’m still filling it with gas. What did the promised transportation revolution delivered instead? The Segway. The company first marketed itself as "the next generation in personal mobility," which apparently meant traveling at about 12.5 miles (20 km) per hour with a range of 24 miles (38 km) before you had to re-charge the lithium-ion battery packs. As revolutionary as The Jetsons? This can’t even compete with the Batmobile. \n\nThe inventor of the Segway, Dean Kamen, once predicted that, "the Segway will be to the car what the car was to the horse and buggy." I remember the buzz that the Segway would mean the end to walking. It is hard to support the idea that the next transportation revolution should be the end of walking. \n\nDean Kamen is a smart guy – certainly smarter than I am. But the Segway was obviously designed in vacuum; devoid of consumer input. The "if you build it, they will come" model of product development – focused on engineering rather than consumer research – is based on hope and, as the cliché goes, hope is not a strategy. So I hope to contrast my ideas – whether you think they are any good or not – with those of engineers, like Kamen. Since I’m certainly not an engineer, I consider myself instead a technologist, which I define like this: the optimist sees the glass half full; the pessimist sees the glass half empty; and the technologist wonders why the engineer didn’t talk to anyone before building a glass that was twice as large as anyone wanted or needed.\n

Archaeologists unearth dozens of mummified cats in Egypt

Dozens of mummified cats were dug up this week. This isn't as shocking as you might think.

KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
Culture & Religion
  • Archaeologists in Egypt have found dozens of mummified cats in the tomb of a royal offical.
  • The cats will join the ranks of hundreds of thousands of previously discovered ancient kitties.
  • While the cats are nothing special, the tomb also held well preserved beetles.
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Men obsessed with building muscle mass have higher mental health risks

They're at a higher risk for depression, weekend binge drinking, and unnecessary dieting.

Palestinian participants flex their muscles during a bodybuilding competition in Gaza city on October 28, 2016. / AFP / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
Mind & Brain
  • Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows.
  • Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems.
  • Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed.
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A.I. turns 57 million crop fields into stunning abstract art

Detailed (and beautiful) information on 57 million crop fields across the U.S. and Europe are now available online.

Image: OneSoil
Strange Maps
  • Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world.
  • The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020.
  • The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button.
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