Got a question for Michelle Thaller? Ask it here!

NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller is coming back to Big Think's studio soon to answer YOUR questions! Here's all you need to know to submit your science-related inquiries.

Big Think's amazing audience has responded so well to our videos from NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller that we couldn't wait to bring her back for more!

This March, she's ready to tackle any questions you're willing to throw at her, such as, "How big is the universe?" or "Am I really made of stardust?" or, "How long until Elon Musk starts a colony on Mars?"

All you have to do is submit your questions to the form below, and we'll use them for an upcoming Q+A session with Michelle. You know what to do, Big Thinkers!


Here's a question Michelle answered from a Big Thinker!

Here are more great questions submitted by you, our awesome audience!

Ask a NASA astronomer! Would scientists tell us about a looming apocalypse?

There is no "center" to the universe, and the Big Bang wasn't an explosion. Michelle explains all.

How futuristic ion rockets might supercharge space exploration

How self-healing DNA may protect astronauts from killer radiation

Art vs. science? The battle that never was

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