Bespoke suicide pods now available for death in style

Sarco assisted suicide pods come in three different styles, and allow you to die quickly and painlessly. They're even quite beautiful to look at.

Death: it happens to everyone (except, apparently, Keanu Reeves). But while the impoverished and lower-class people of the world die in the same ol' ways—cancer, heart disease, and so forth—the upper classes can choose hip and cool new ways to die. Now, there's an assisted-suicide pod so chic and so stylin' that peeps (young people still say peeps, right?) are calling it the "Tesla" of death... it's called... the Sarco! 


The Sarco - short for sarcophagus, if you're asking - is an assisted suicide pod that seals the, um, 'user' inside and then lowers the oxygen level, creating a feeling of intoxication and relaxation. It's sort of like dry drowning: your body goes through hypoxia without the negative effects of, well, choking for breath and panicking. 

The user has to take a test beforehand to make sure they're of sane mind before they use it. If they pass the test, they get a code that's valid for 24 hours. Feed the code into the machine and it opens. You sit in it, and all you have to do is push a button, says its inventor Philip Nitschke. There was even a VR experience (woohoo!) recently at Amsterdam's wonderfully-named Funeral Fair, wherein plucky convention-goers got to simulate, through VR, what it would be like to kill themselves in the Sarco (Want to see for yourself?). 

Jokes aside, it's good to see suicide openly talked about. If a world where we can control almost every aspect of our lives, from personalized playlists to driverless cars, it's nice to think that we can control the way we die, too. There's some real validity to that. 

Anyway. There are 3 different designs according to the Sarco website. A 3D printed version to assemble at home, a portable version for when you wanna get up and literally go, and even one that acts as its own coffin. Fun! 

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