New Documentary Chronicles Philosophy in Motion

Astra Taylor, the documentary filmmaker whose 2005 film “Zizek!” accompanied the Slovene philosopher Slavoj Zizek on a lecture tour is now debuting her second film, “Examined Life."

According to the New York Times, the film "recruits a wide array of thinkers and theorists to muse out loud about the role of philosophy in our lives, playing off the Socratic observation that 'the unexamined life is not worth living.'”


The central conceit of the film by the 29 year-old Taylor is that philosophy must be taken out of the ivory tower and affirmed "in the flux of everyday life." To accomplish this, she recreates the idea of "the peripatetic philosopher, from Aristotle (who paced the Lyceum while teaching) to Kierkegaard (a proponent of thinking while walking, which he frequently did in the Copenhagen streets) to Walter Benjamin (the embodiment of the Paris flâneur)," acccording to the Times.

Except that Taylor puts Cornel West in the back of a New York City cab, she films deconstructionist critic Avital Ronell strolling through Tompkins Square Park in the East Village, and features Michael Hardt, the co-author (with Antonio Negri) of the new-world-order treatise “Empire,” rowing a boat in Central Park "while wondering what a present-day revolution might look like."

According to the Times, Taylor "realized that putting her subjects in motion would elicit a different kind of interview than if they were seated behind their desks in offices."

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

26 ultra-rich people own as much as the world's 3.8 billion poorest

The Oxfam report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency."

Getty Images and Wikimedia Commons
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report by Oxfam argues that wealth inequality is causing poverty and misery around the world.
  • In the last year, the world's billionaires saw their wealth increase by 12%, while the poorest 3.8 billion people on the planet lost 11% of their wealth.
  • The report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency." We explain what Steven Pinker's got to do with it.
Keep reading Show less

People who constantly complain are harmful to your health

Moans, groans, and gripes release stress hormones in the brain.

Photo credit: Getty Images / Stringer
popular

Could you give up complaining for a whole month? That's the crux of this interesting piece by Jessica Hullinger over at Fast Company. Hullinger explores the reasons why humans are so predisposed to griping and why, despite these predispositions, we should all try to complain less. As for no complaining for a month, that was the goal for people enrolled in the Complaint Restraint project.

Participants sought to go the entirety of February without so much as a moan, groan, or bellyache.

Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes.
  • Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that?
  • But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users.
Keep reading Show less