The Bios Incube Lets Loved Ones Live on as a Tree

Bios Urn gives people the choice to leave a sustainable and meaningful impact on our world when we pass—a tree instead of a tombstone. However, not everyone has a backyard available, which is why the company developed Bios Incube.

Even in death, we impact the environment in some way. Bios Urn gives people the choice to leave a sustainable and meaningful impact on our world when we pass—a tree instead of a tombstone. However, not everyone has a backyard available, which is why the company developed Bios Incube.




"Bios Incube changes the way people see death, converting the 'end of life' into a transformation and a return to life through nature,” the company wrote. “[It is] a smart, sustainable, and ecologically friendly way to approach what’s, probably, one of the most important moments in human life.”

The Bios Urn is a 100 percent bio-degradabe urn, made of coconut shell, compacted peat, and cellulose. The ashes are stored in the bottom of the pot. because of their acidity, seedlings may not be able to germinate within the ashes, directly. But once the plant begins to grow, its roots will be strong enough to make contact, and the ashes become mixed with the soil. The trees available for purchase with the Urn (Pine, Maple, Ginko, Ash, and Beech) grow naturally in acidic soil.

The Urn's development paved the way towards the Incube, which has been designed for urban dwellers with limited access to natural land. The Incube is a smart-pot—a ground's keeper for your personal plant that holds the future tree of which your loved-one's ashes will become apart.

The Bios Urn is placed into the Incube, which will monitor the environmental conditions to make sure the plant has the right conditions to thrive. It can sustain up to 3 gallons of water, so it can nourish the tree accordingly. A mobile app lets you stay connected to your tree even when your away.



Unlike the Urn, the Incube isn't available for purchase, yet. The company is seeking funds through Kickstarter to help with mass production.



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Photo Credit: Urnabios

Natalie has been writing professionally for about 6 years. After graduating from Ithaca College with a degree in Feature Writing, she snagged a job at PCMag.com where she had the opportunity to review all the latest consumer gadgets. Since then she has become a writer for hire, freelancing for various websites. In her spare time, you may find her riding her motorcycle, reading YA novels, hiking, or playing video games. Follow her on Twitter: @nat_schumaker

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