ISTE 2010 - Do you have a plan? Here's mine...

I head to Denver tomorrow, eager and excited for the ISTE conference. I’ve got a plan this year; there are some things I want to learn and some conversations I want to have…


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Things for which I’m scheduled

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Things I hope will happen (if you can help with any of these, please come say hi!)

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  • Have my usual rockin’ awesome time at Edubloggercon. Some of my best conversations and learning each year are here.
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  • Faciliate our proposed discussion at Edubloggercon. Sylvia Martinez and I are proposing a conversation about the challenges of being an outside speaker/consultant. I don’t know if we’ll make the final agenda but I hope so!
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  • Learn more about Google Voice. I need someone to help me get the most out of my new phone service.
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  • Learn more about Google Apps for Education. I’m interested in talking with educators who are using this well with students in their school organization.
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  • Learn more about the School of One. I’d love to talk with someone who’s seen it in action!
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  • Learn more about robust learning software that does a good job of working with students at higher cognitive levels. These may be more like simulations or video games than traditional computer-based learning programs? Can I find software that’s doing performance assessment, not just fact assessment?
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  • Learn more about essay grading software. I’d like to see how this software class has changed since last time I looked at it.
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  • Maybe find funding for some CASTLE projects? This may be what draws me into the vendor area. I need to talk to some larger companies about some potential project sponsorship opportunities.
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  • Learn new things that aren’t even on my radar. This usually happens a great deal for me, so I’m not too worried. Maybe I’ll pick up some tricks/tips for my new iPad!
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Other thoughts

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I’m deliberately leaving much of the conference open. I want to reserve space for spur-of-the-moment conversations and serendipitous interactions. If you want to chat - even if we’ve never met before - please come introduce yourself!

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Trying to reach me at the conference? Try @mcleod on Twitter or call/text me at 707–722–7853. I’ll also be hanging out a lot in the Bloggers’ Café.

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What’s your plan for the ISTE conference? Hope to see you there!

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