Inside Employees' Minds: An Introduction

I’m not happy at work. That is what more and more workers around the world are saying today. In fact, according to a new survey, between 28% and 56% of workers in 17 key countries around the world are seriously considering leaving their jobs at the present time, with younger workers even more likely to be considering an exit.


Compared to past years, employees are now less committed to their employers and less satisfied overall. There are multiple reasons for this shift, including income stagnation, and decreases in benefits. Broadly speaking, the social contract between employers and employees has been reshaped in recent years, and the perception that employees are getting a "raw deal" has been felt ever more acutely in the context of the economic downturn.

So how are employees reacting to these changes? Particularly if they’re a member of the Millennial generation, these workers will jump ship if they see a better opportunity. So how can employers re-engage their employees?

Inside Employees' Minds: Navigating the New Rules of Engagement is a new series on Big Think that corresponds with the release of the findings of Mercer’s What's Working™ survey. This global survey examined the work views of nearly 30,000 people in 17 countries. Inside Employees’ Minds asks leading business leaders, academics and behavioral psychologists to help our audience understand what motivates people to work, and how to bring back a sense of meaning to the work experience.

Contributors include John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods, Dan Ariely, Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University, Roger Martin, Dean of the Rotman School of Management, and Jennifer Deal, Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Creative Leadership in San Diego, California.

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