What to Do When You're Stuck at Your Job

If you’re stuck at your job, there’s so many different options.  For instance, you can turn your passion into a new position.

What to Do When You're Stuck at Your Job

If you’re stuck at your job, there’s so many different options.  First, you can turn your passion into a new position.  You can make a lateral move in your company.  You can try and get a promotion.  You can try and ask for new responsibilities. 


If you want a career change and if you’re really unhappy with your profession, maybe you chose accounting and maybe you want to do finance or marketing, then maybe you can go back to school or you can take other classes that are free online to help you get those skills. 

Maybe you do freelancing; maybe you start your own business.  There’s so many different options, and you have to weigh everything and that really depends on your position. 

For Millennials just starting off, you have a little bit more freedom.  You don’t have a whole family you need to take care of.  Maybe you’re staying with your parents and you want to do some freelancing on the side and maybe you’re just trying to see what opportunities are waiting for you. 

But you want to do as much as you can and as early as possible as you can in your career to figure out what you want to do and what you don’t want to do and then put more of your energy doing what you really want to do.  If you put a lot of effort into what you want to do you’ll end up really excited about what you are doing, like I am.  

In Their Own Words is recorded in Big Think's studio.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

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