Gazing Into the Future of Knowledge Abundance

We will have abundance in terms of knowledge and equality and we won’t have the bottom billion anymore, but what I call the rising billion.  

Life began on this planet about 3.5 billion years ago with what was called prokaryotic life.  It was a very simple life form, it was DNA inside of a cell, no organs, no brain containing cellular subcomponents.  What happened was that simple life became eukaryotic life, more advance single-cell life form, and then that ended up becoming multi-cellular life form and eventually until it became you and I, an organism of 10 trillion cells with organs and tissues.  


The same thing is happening in our world today.  We humans are those simple individual life forms that are beginning to bring technology into our bodies, whether it’s the cell phone or eventually brain/computer interface.  Now it will ultimately allow us to link together into what I think of as the meta-intelligence of the future where I’ll begin to have full cognitive knowledge, you know, search will be something instantaneous.  I’ll think about it and know what’s going on.  But more so, I’ll have knowledge of what a sun rise looks like right now in Japan and what people are feeling in other parts of the world.  

The benefit thereof is to create sort of a level of total human consciousness that’s never been understood before in a way that I hope will give us a great deal of unity as a species and really give us a level of abundance in the world.  We will have abundance in terms of knowledge and equality and we won’t have the bottom billion anymore, but what I call the rising billion.  

In Their Own Words is recorded in Big Think's studio. 

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

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