Your Future Surgeon May Be Wearing Google Glass

Medical professionals are demonstrating how Google Glass could be used for tasks ranging from viewing CAT scans during surgery to recording an actual procedure for educational purposes.

What's the Latest Development?


While a good deal of concern still hovers around Google Glass and its potential for disrupting normal life, some medical professionals are eagerly looking forward to bringing the technology into the health care arena. At the Health Innovation Summit held in San Francisco earlier this month, surgeon Pierre Theodore described how the device allowed him to pull up and use for comparison a patient's CAT scan images while he was performing surgery on that patient. He "likened the experience to driving a car and glancing in the rearview mirror." In June, another surgeon, Rafael Grossman, live-streamed a procedure (leaving the patient's face out of the video) while wearing the device.

What's the Big Idea?

The battle for the eyes and minds of medical professionals may be an uphill one, particularly for those who have established longstanding routines, but app developers like Ian Shakil, CEO of Augmedix, see a bright future ahead. He suggests that Google Glass' recording capabilities could improve communication during exam visits by creating a video that could serve as a reference and information tool for both doctor and patient. The device could also help doctors manage "the beast" of tedious office tasks like coding.

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