U.S. Army Going Android?

The U.S. Army is crazy for apps and incoming Chief of Staff Ray Odierno may soon decide whether to require soldiers to carry smartphones as a standard piece of gear. 

What's the Latest Development?


Smart phones look like replacing the U.S. Army’s multi-million program, Nett Warrior, to outfit soldiers with wearable computers. That program was put on ice  in July while the Army reviewed whether it made sense "to make soldiers wear eight pounds of gear to do less than what a few-once phone (plus a tactical, encrypted radio) can offer." Wired says that effectively the Army is now preparing to shop for smartphones and insisting that they "be powered by Android."

What's the Big Idea?

Generic, commercial smartphones handled network usage well during a recent test at the White Sands Missile Range this summer. And incoming Chief of Staff Ray Odierno may soon decide whether to require soldiers to carry smartphones as a standard piece of gear. The Army envisions a “smartphone or smartphone-like device (repackaged smartphone technology)” that can provide “commercial-based, integrated computer, display and data-entry capability for dismounted use in either standalone or networked configuration.”

Related Articles

A controversial theory claims past, present, and future exist at the same time

Our experience of time may be blinding us to its true nature, say scientists.

Back to the Future.
Surprising Science
  • Time may not be passing at all, says the Block Universe Theory.
  • Time travel may be possible.
  • Your perception of time is likely relative to you and limited.
Keep reading Show less

Six disastrous encounters with the world’s most hostile uncontacted tribe

From questionable shipwrecks to outright attacks, they clearly don't want to be bothered.

Culture & Religion
  • Many have tried to contact the Sentinelese, to write about them, or otherwise.
  • But the inhabitants of the 23 square mile island in the Bay of Bengal don't want anything to do with the outside world.
  • Their numbers are unknown, but either 40 or 500 remain.
Keep reading Show less