Twitter Detractor

Ricky Gervais closed his Twitter account six weeks after joining to promote the Golden Globes calling the service “pointless” and users “undignified”.

Ricky Gervais closed his Twitter account six weeks after joining to promote the Golden Globes calling the service "pointless" and users "undignified". "Ricky Gervais has quit Twitter, branding the site ‘pointless’ and the adults who use it ‘undignified’. Leaving the microblogging site after less than a month of tweeting, he complained that celebrities used it for "showing off" and he did not need to make ‘new virtual friends’. The comedian and creator of The Office started tweeting on 14 December after Golden Globe bosses told him to promote the awards ceremony, which he is hosting on Sunday. However, after only six tweets he announced he was stopping. ‘As you may know I've stopped with Twitter,’ he wrote on his blog. ‘I just don't get it I'm afraid. I'm sure it's fun as a networking device for teenagers but there's something a bit undignified about adults using it. Particularly celebrities who seem to be showing off by talking to each other in public. If I want to tell a friend, famous or otherwise what I had to eat this morning, I'll text them. And since I don't need to make new virtual friends, it seemed a bit pointless to be honest.’"

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