Trojan Horse

A nasty virus has been hitching a lift on Facebook’s password reset confirmation email, posing a risk for users.

A new form of troublesome computer virus the Bredolab Trojan horse has been hitching a ride on the back of Facebook’s password reset email confirmation, according to CNET news. "Some users are receiving the e-mail from ‘The Facebook Team,’ according to the security firm. The sender's e-mail address displays ‘service@facebook.com.’ In reality, the address and sender were spoofed," it reports. "When a user downloads the file, it could wreak havoc on their computer. MX Labs said in a blog post that the Trojan horse Bredolab ‘executes files from the Internet, such as rogue anti-spyware. To bypass firewalls, it injects its own code into legitimate processes svchost.exe and explorer.exe. Bredolab contains anti-sandbox code (the trojan might quit itself when an external program investigates its actions).’ In other words, it's nasty."

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