This Watch Provides A Countdown To Your Death

Never mind the fact that watches aren't as popular as they used to be: The Tikker has already blown past its Kickstarter crowdfunding goal. Writer John Kruzel thinks it might have something to do with the appeal of YOLO.

What's the Latest Development?


A wristwatch currently being pitched via Kickstarter interprets "carpe diem" literally: The Tikker comes with a health and lifestyle questionnaire that, when completed, calculates the approximate moment of the wearer's death. Once they subtract their current age, the watch begins a running countdown showing years, months, days, hours, minutes, and seconds. Below this it shows the current time as well. With 21 days left as of today (Oct. 10) the company has nabbed nearly twice its original $25,000 funding goal.

What's the Big Idea?

Given that wristwatches aren't quite as popular as they used to be, writer John Kruzel explains the Tikker's surprising appeal as, well, timely: "Perhaps Tikker has tapped into a rich cultural vein that transcends generational divides. The $39 gadget would seem not only to validate but actually quantify millennials' YOLO ethos." According to the Kickstarter page, the watch's makers hope to capture how wearing a constant reminder of death might change how the wearer lives. "A week spent in love and happiness can be worth more than a year spent in agony. If you knew how much time you had left, wouldn't you use that time wisely?"

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at Slate

Related Articles

Why are Americans so bad at math?

Research shows that the way math is taught in schools and how its conceptualized as a subject is severely impairing American student's ability to learn and understand the material.

One derivative coming right up... (Photo: Getty Images)
Technology & Innovation
  • Americans continually score either in the mid- or bottom-tier when it comes to math and science compared to their international peers.
  • Students have a fundamental misunderstanding of what math is and what it can do. By viewing it as a language, students and teachers can begin to conceptualize it in easier and more practical ways.
  • A lot of mistakes come from worrying too much about rote memorization and speedy problem-solving and from students missing large gaps in a subject that is reliant on learning concepts sequentially.
Keep reading Show less

How swimming in cold water could treat depression

The surprisingly simple treatment could prove promising for doctors and patients seeking to treat depression without medication.

Photo by Luis Marina/Flickr
Mind & Brain
  • A new report shows how cold-water swimming was an effective treatment for a 24-year-old mother.
  • The treatment is based on cross-adaptation, a phenomenon where individuals become less sensitive to a stimulus after being exposed to another.
  • Getting used to the shock of cold-water swimming could blunt your body's sensitivity to other stressors.
Keep reading Show less

Eating your kids may improve your sex life? Sounds fishy.

Maybe try counseling first before you try this, married folks.

Photo by David Clode on Unsplash
Surprising Science
  • The study looks at cannibalism in fish.
  • If it doesn't look like the brood is going to be 'productive,' it might get eaten.
  • Don't try this at home. Seriously, don't. Human beings deserve love and respect.
Keep reading Show less