This Board Might Even Make You Into A Skater

A company is taking orders for its new skateboard, billed as "the lightest electric vehicle in the world." With a small remote and motor-activated braking, it could appeal to environmentally conscious people who've never skated before.

Article written by guest writer Kecia Lynn


What's the Latest Development?

A company called Boosted Boards recently launched a Kickstarter campaign in which it's taking orders for the latest version of its namesake: A new type of electric skateboard that's lighter in weight, easier to control, and more powerful than its predecessors. The board boasts a electric motor and brakes that are both activated by a handheld wireless remote. The lithium-ion battery gets six miles when fully charged, and is recharged when the skater brakes. 

What's the Big Idea?

There are still some bugs to fix, but the board and the company have Stanford University know-how behind it, and the engineering team says they should start shipping next summer. Writer Josh Constine, a skater himself, tested two prototypes in not-exactly-flat San Francisco, and says that the small remote and quiet motor will "draw dumb-founded stares from people clueless to how you're cruising uphill without pushing." He also says that this isn't your little brother's board: "These are serious, eco-friendly transportation devices that could replace your bike, scooter, or maybe even your car."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

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