This Bike Helmet Records 360 Degrees Of Video

Designed by mobile tech company Chaotic Moon to capture events taking place during an accident, it has one of the coolest names ever: The Helmet of Justice.

What's the Latest Development?


Designers at mobile tech company Chaotic Moon took a bike helmet, embedded tiny cameras into the air vents, added other sensors and a detachable USB drive, and wrote software to enable all the technology to work together. The result is The Helmet of Justice, and as its name suggests, it provides a 360-degree view of events in case its wearer is involved in an accident. The cameras turn on when the helmet senses jarring movement, and can record up to two hours of video at 30 frames per second. Future enhancements being considered include the ability to turn on the cameras when something is coming at the cyclist.

What's the Big Idea?

The Helmet of Justice was inspired by the experience of designer John Poindexter, who found himself in a hospital after a hit-and-run with no recollection of what had happened. With this version, CEO Ben Lamm says that "[a] paramedic could pull the USB drive out, stick it in a laptop, and see what happened." Chaotic Moon is currently discussing partnerships with manufacturers to bring the helmet to market, and while it probably wouldn't be cheap in the beginning -- Lamm estimates a starting cost of around $300 -- a manufacturer with a large-enough supply chain could bring that price down.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

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