The Super Bowl is a Gigantic Physics Classroom

Sports and science go together like Beast Mode and Skittles. Throws, collisions, sprints, and kicks are all dependent on the Laws of Physics.

It's common practice for physics professors and public scientists to use pop culture to teach science lessons. Our buddy Neil deGrasse Tyson is a good example. He drops science facts filtered through movies:


In #Interstellar: You observe great Tidal Waves from great Tidal Forces, of magnitude that orbiting a Black Hole might create

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

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Why the number 137 is one of the greatest mysteries in physics

Famous physicists like Richard Feynman think 137 holds the answers to the Universe.

Pixabay
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  • The fine structure constant has mystified scientists since the 1800s.
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