Stephen Hawking's Philosophy of Science

Is Hawking right to claim that reality is dependent on the model used to describe it, that models generated by biochemical processes in our brains constitute “reality”?

In his new book, The Grand Design, co-authored with the Caltech mathematician Leonard Mlodinow, Hawking presents a philosophy of science he calls "model-dependent realism," which is based on the assumption that our brains form models of the world from sensory input, that we use the model most successful at explaining events and assume that the models match reality (even if they do not), and that when more than one model makes accurate predictions "we are free to use whichever model is most convenient." Employing this method, Hawking and Mlodinow claim that "it is pointless to ask whether a model is real, only whether it agrees with observation."

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