Spice Of Life

A key component in a popular Indian spice could delay liver damage and cirrhosis, according to a new study published in the research journal “Gut.”

A key component in a popular Indian spice could delay liver damage and cirrhosis, according to a new study published in the research journal "Gut." Curcumin, which gives turmeric its bright yellow hue, has traditionally been used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine to treat varying gastrointestinal disorders as it is known for having anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Researchers wanted to investigate if the ingredient could be used to treat more progressive inflammatory conditions of the liver, including primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. "Both of these conditions, which can be sparked by genetic faults or autoimmune disease, cause the liver's plumbing system of bile ducts to become inflamed, scarred, and blocked. This leads to extensive tissue damage and irreversible and ultimately fatal liver cirrhosis. The research team analysed tissue and blood samples from mice with chronic liver inflammation before and after adding curcumin to their diet for a period of four and a period of eight weeks. The results were compared with the equivalent samples from mice with the same condition, but not fed curcumin. The findings showed that the curcumin diet significantly reduced bile duct blockage and curbed liver cell (hepatocyte) damage and scarring (fibrosis) by interfering with several chemical signalling pathways involved in the inflammatory process."

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

Reigning in brutality - how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

The history of the Geneva Conventions tells us how the international community draws the line on brutality.

Napoleon III at the Battle of Solferino. Painting by Adolphe Yvon. 1861.
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely.
  • Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more.
  • Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries.
Keep reading Show less

The most culturally chauvinist people in Europe? Greeks, new research suggests

Meanwhile, Spaniards are the least likely to say their culture is superior to others.

Image: Pew Research Center
Strange Maps
  • Survey by Pew Research Center shows great variation in chauvinism across Europe.
  • Eight most chauvinist countries are in the east, and include Russia.
  • British much more likely than French (and slightly more likely than Germans) to say their culture is "superior" to others.
Keep reading Show less

ACLU urges Amazon, Microsoft & Google not to sell face recognition tech to government

"Companies can't continue to pretend that the 'break then fix' approach works."

Photo credit: Ian Waldie / Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The coalition argues that government agencies might abuse facial recognition technology.
  • Google and Microsoft have expressed concern about the potential problems of facial recognition technology.
  • Meanwhile, Amazon has been actively marketing the technology to law enforcement agencies in the U.S.
Keep reading Show less