Sorry, Scotty's Not Coming To Beam You Up

In case you were holding out any hope: Students at the University of Leicester have calculated exactly how long it would take to teleport a human from Earth to a point in circular orbit. The short answer: A really, really, really long time.

What's the Latest Development?


Included in the most recent issue of the University of Leicester's Journal of Physics Special Topics -- a journal that encourages creative thinking among its student authors -- is a paper that attempts to examine teleportation as a means of practical travel. The students based their paper on the ability of a person to "beam" off Earth to a point in orbit -- a transporter room in a spaceship, for example. By reducing that person to the sum total, in bits, of their bodily data, they were then able to calculate the time and power needed to transmit that data into space. Their result, based on a bandwidth between 29.5 and 30 GHz: 4.85x1015 years. 

What's the Big Idea?

While other technologies commonly associated with "Star Trek" have found their way into this century, very few scientists, if any, ever believed human teleportation would be one of them. Even if it were possible to reduce a person to data bits and then reassemble them correctly, without more efficient methods of transmission it would take longer than the age of the universe -- currently estimated at 14x109 years -- to send a single person from Earth to a ship in orbit. Co-author David Starkey's dry conclusion: "Current means of travel remain more feasible."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at ScienceDaily

How Pete Holmes creates comedic flow: Try micro-visualization

Setting a simple intention and coming prepared can help you — and those around you — win big.

Videos
  • Setting an intention doesn't have to be complicated, and it can make a great difference when you're hoping for a specific outcome.
  • When comedian Pete Holmes is preparing to record an episode of his podcast, "You Made it Weird with Pete Holmes," he takes 15 seconds to check in with himself. This way, he's primed with his own material and can help guests feel safe and comfortable to share theirs, as well.
  • Taking time to visualize your goal for whatever you've set out to do can help you, your colleagues, and your projects succeed.
Keep reading Show less

Brazil's Amazon fires: How they started, and how you can help.

The Amazon Rainforest is often called "the planet's lungs."

NASA
Politics & Current Affairs
  • For weeks, fires have been burning in the Amazon rainforest in Brazil, likely started by farmers and ranchers.
  • Brazil's president, Jair Bolsonaro, has blamed NGOs for starting the flames, offering no evidence to support the claim.
  • There are small steps you can take to help curb deforestation in the Amazon rainforest, which produces about 20 percent of the world's oxygen.
Keep reading Show less

Bigotry and hate are more linked to mass shootings than mental illness, experts say

How do we combat the roots of these hateful forces?

Photo credit: Rux Centea on Unsplash
Politics & Current Affairs
  • American Psychological Association sees a dubious and weak link between mental illness and mass shootings.
  • Center for the study of Hate and Extremism has found preliminary evidence that political discourse is tied to hate crimes.
  • Access to guns and violent history is still the number one statistically significant figure that predicts gun violence.
Keep reading Show less