Should Genetically Modified Foods Have Labels?

The state of California is leaving it up to its voters to decide if packaged foods containing genetically engineered ingredients, should come with a label.

Article written by guest writer Rin Mitchell


What’s the Latest Development?

Reportedly 80 percent of packaged foods in the United States contain genetically engineered ingredients; however, they are not easy to identify since food producers are not legally required to add the information to their product labels. In November, Proposition 37which is a California law allowing consumers the right to know what is in products on the marketwill go to the ballots for voters to decide. If the law is passed, then packaged foods in Californiawith the exception of alcohol, meat, poultry and dairywill have to be accompanied by special labels. Industry analysts believe this could put farmers, food companies and grocers at a competitive disadvantage, and they would “have to spend cash to ensure that they keep entirely separate facilities for GE and non-GE crops.” Although according to the Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA), the bigger issue is the "proximity of GE crops to specialty crops in the state." This law has not been duplicated in any other states. Based on reports, both Vermont and Connecticut were set to pass a similar law, but they each “pulled back because of fear of legal reprisal and legal bills from the biotech industry.”

What’s the Big Idea? 

Industry experts believe California’s Proposition 37 that could require food producers to tack GE labels onto their products is extreme and insensible. They believe it will hurt family farmers, food companies and grocers in California. "Other countries have GE labeling requirements, but only require labeling for products that contain small percentages of GE ingredients ( .9% to 5%)." Dairy, meat, poultry and alcohol will be exempt from donning special labeling.

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

What’s behind our appetite for self-destruction?

Is it "perverseness," the "death drive," or something else?

Photo by Brad Neathery on Unsplash
Mind & Brain

Each new year, people vow to put an end to self-destructive habits like smoking, overeating or overspending.

Keep reading Show less

A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

She met mere mortals with and without the Vatican's approval.

Strange Maps
  • For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.
  • These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.
  • Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too.
Keep reading Show less

Douglas Rushkoff – It’s not the technology’s fault

It's up to us humans to re-humanize our world. An economy that prioritizes growth and profits over humanity has led to digital platforms that "strip the topsoil" of human behavior, whole industries, and the planet, giving less and less back. And only we can save us.

Think Again Podcasts
  • It's an all-hands-on-deck moment in the arc of civilization.
  • Everyone has a choice: Do you want to try to earn enough money to insulate yourself from the world you're creating— or do you want to make the world a place you don't have to insulate yourself from?
Keep reading Show less