Through Blended Learning, Schools Adopt Automated Lesson Plans for Each Student

What happens when you let a computer determine each child's personalized curriculum? Math teachers in several schools across America are seeing results through a growing brand of "blended learning."

Nichole Dobo of the nonprofit education news website The Hechinger Report has a piece up over at Slate about a growing education approach called blended learning. In short, blended learning is a combination of classroom methods that merges teacher instruction and lessons designed and executed by computers.


In her piece, Dobo visits a middle school in Brooklyn in which 150 sixth graders occupy a cafeteria-sized classroom where they are grouped together based on their relative proficiencies. The results of a quiz taken a few days prior determined that day's lesson plan for each group. Teachers walk around the room to help kids who need it. Advanced students were allowed to do their work on laptops without being disturbed.

Dobo writes that blended learning is the future, particularly of the variety in which personalized lesson plans for each student are formulated by computers. The more advanced our technology gets, the greater the ability for schools to scale personalized curricula for students. This way no students get left behind and no student gets bored by being too far ahead.

Read more about blended learning over at Slate.

Image credit: soliman design / Shutterstock

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