Obsessed

March Madness isn't the only insanity surrounding the American (and global) obsession with sports but just how skewed have our priorities become?

March Madness isn't the only insanity surrounding the American (and global) obsession with sports but just how skewed have our priorities become? "At a time when the economy is faltering, wars are raging, and the future seems worrisome on a good day, many are looking to sports as a source not merely of distraction, but of personal identification. It's gotten to the point where English may no longer be our official language. Sports might be. We listen to it endlessly on talk radio. We chat about it over the cubicles at work. We push our kids into it when they are still in their Maclaren strollers. We spend vast amounts of money on everything from LeBron James jerseys to greens fees: The National Sporting Goods Association estimates that sports represents a $441 billion industry in the US – the same as the gross domestic product of Norway."

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