NASA Experiment Will Pay You $18,000 To Stay In Bed

To test the effects of microgravity on astronauts traveling on extended space missions, the agency will pay qualified candidates who are willing and able to stay (mostly) horizontal for 70 days straight.

NASA Experiment Will Pay You $18,000 To Stay In Bed

What's the Latest Development?


NASA is currently looking for people who are willing to lie in a special bed, tilted head-down at a six-degree angle, for 70 days...straight. Selected participants will be paid $1,200 per week for 15 weeks: a total of $18,000. There are a number of caveats: Candidates will need to pass rigorous physical and psychological tests to ensure that they resemble, according to the application form, "the [NASA] astronaut population." Those selected can spend their time doing anything they want -- surfing the Internet, reading, even working remotely if their job lets them -- so long as they don't get out of bed.

What's the Big Idea?

The study is meant to examine the effects of microgravity on humans during extended space missions. Tilting the bed affects the cardiovascular system in ways similar to those experienced in space, and lying in a horizontal position causes muscle and bone density atrophy. After the 70 days end, test subjects will perform a series of exercises and tasks that resemble those astronauts would do once they arrived at their destination. Senior scientist Roni Cromwell says that the results "will [eventually] help astronauts maintain their health while in space."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at Forbes

Scientists see 'rarest event ever recorded' in search for dark matter

The team caught a glimpse of a process that takes 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 years.

Image source: Pixabay
Surprising Science
  • In Italy, a team of scientists is using a highly sophisticated detector to hunt for dark matter.
  • The team observed an ultra-rare particle interaction that reveals the half-life of a xenon-124 atom to be 18 sextillion years.
  • The half-life of a process is how long it takes for half of the radioactive nuclei present in a sample to decay.
Keep reading Show less

Psychogenic shivers: Why we get the chills when we aren’t cold

Humans are particularly prone to shiver when a group does or thinks the same thing at the same time.

Paramount/Getty Images
Mind & Brain

A few years ago, I proposed that the feeling of cold in one's spine, while for example watching a film or listening to music, corresponds to an event when our vital need for cognition is satisfied.

Keep reading Show less

Colors evoke similar emotions around the world, survey finds

Certain colors are globally linked to certain feelings, the study reveals.

Credit: Liudmila Dutko on Adobe Stock
Mind & Brain
  • Color psychology is often used in marketing to alter your perception of products and services.
  • Various studies and experiments across multiple years have given us more insight into the link between personality and color.
  • The results of a new study spanning 6 continents (30 nations) shows universal correlations between colors and emotions around the globe.
Keep reading Show less
Coronavirus

COVID-19 may cause 'significant' cognitive deficits, study says

A growing body of research suggests COVID-19 can cause neurological damage in some patients.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast