NASA Experiment Will Pay You $18,000 To Stay In Bed

To test the effects of microgravity on astronauts traveling on extended space missions, the agency will pay qualified candidates who are willing and able to stay (mostly) horizontal for 70 days straight.

What's the Latest Development?


NASA is currently looking for people who are willing to lie in a special bed, tilted head-down at a six-degree angle, for 70 days...straight. Selected participants will be paid $1,200 per week for 15 weeks: a total of $18,000. There are a number of caveats: Candidates will need to pass rigorous physical and psychological tests to ensure that they resemble, according to the application form, "the [NASA] astronaut population." Those selected can spend their time doing anything they want -- surfing the Internet, reading, even working remotely if their job lets them -- so long as they don't get out of bed.

What's the Big Idea?

The study is meant to examine the effects of microgravity on humans during extended space missions. Tilting the bed affects the cardiovascular system in ways similar to those experienced in space, and lying in a horizontal position causes muscle and bone density atrophy. After the 70 days end, test subjects will perform a series of exercises and tasks that resemble those astronauts would do once they arrived at their destination. Senior scientist Roni Cromwell says that the results "will [eventually] help astronauts maintain their health while in space."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at Forbes

Related Articles
Playlists
Keep reading Show less

Five foods that increase your psychological well-being

These five main food groups are important for your brain's health and likely to boost the production of feel-good chemicals.

Mind & Brain

We all know eating “healthy” food is good for our physical health and can decrease our risk of developing diabetes, cancer, obesity and heart disease. What is not as well known is that eating healthy food is also good for our mental health and can decrease our risk of depression and anxiety.

Keep reading Show less

For the 99%, the lines are getting blurry

Infographics show the classes and anxieties in the supposedly classless U.S. economy.

What is the middle class now, anyway? (JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs

For those of us who follow politics, we’re used to commentators referring to the President’s low approval rating as a surprise given the U.S.'s “booming” economy. This seeming disconnect, however, should really prompt us to reconsider the measurements by which we assess the health of an economy. With a robust U.S. stock market and GDP and low unemployment figures, it’s easy to see why some think all is well. But looking at real U.S. wages, which have remained stagnant—and have, thus, in effect gone down given rising costs from inflation—a very different picture emerges. For the 1%, the economy is booming. For the rest of us, it’s hard to even know where we stand. A recent study by Porch (a home-improvement company) of blue-collar vs. white-collar workers shows how traditional categories are becoming less distinct—the study references "new-collar" workers, who require technical certifications but not college degrees. And a set of recent infographics from CreditLoan capturing the thoughts of America’s middle class as defined by the Pew Research Center shows how confused we are.

Keep reading Show less