Maison de Tolérance

Frenchmen would love looser laws to bring back brothels more than 60 years after Paris shut its famed “maisons closes,” according to a campaign stepping up to legalize them.

Frenchmen would love looser laws to bring back brothels more than 60 years after Paris shut its famed "maisons closes," according to a campaign stepping up to legalize them. An MP from President Sarkozy’s UMP party, Chantal Brunel, is spearheading the campaign after she was appointed last month to head the national watchdog on sexual equality. She argues that crime would be cut and sex workers would benefit from "sexual services centers" similarly to those in Amsterdam and some of France’s other European neighbours, The Times reports. "The idea is not to go back to the situation before 1946. I propose that we should consider the creation of places where the purchase of sexual services would be possible with medical, legal and financial protection," Ms Brunel said. Her idea is supported by a recent national poll by the CSA agency which found that 59 per cent of the French public approved the reopening of regulated brothels. The measure was supported by 70 per cent of men polled and 49 per cent of women, with only 13 per cent of women opposed to it.

SpaceX catches Falcon Heavy nosecone with net-outfitted boat

It marks another milestone in SpaceX's long-standing effort to make spaceflight cheaper.

Technology & Innovation
  • SpaceX launched Falcon Heavy into space early Tuesday morning.
  • A part of its nosecone – known as a fairing – descended back to Earth using special parachutes.
  • A net-outfitted boat in the Atlantic Ocean successfully caught the reusable fairing, likely saving the company millions of dollars.
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Are these 100 people killing the planet?

Controversial map names CEOs of 100 companies producing 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

Image: Jordan Engel, reused via Decolonial Media License 0.1
Strange Maps
  • Just 100 companies produce 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gases.
  • This map lists their names and locations, and their CEOs.
  • The climate crisis may be too complex for these 100 people to solve, but naming and shaming them is a good start.
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‘Climate apartheid’: Report says the rich could buy out of climate change disaster

The world's richest people could breeze through a climate disaster – for a price.

(Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report from a United Nation expert warns that an over-reliance on the private sector to mitigate climate change could cause a "climate apartheid."
  • The report criticizes several countries, including the U.S., for taking "short-sighted steps in the wrong direction."
  • The world's poorest populations are most vulnerable to climate change even though they generally contribute the least to global emissions.
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