Looks Like A Strawberry, Tastes Like Bubble Gum

For a few weeks only, the UK-based supermarket chain Waitrose is offering what they're calling "bubbleberries" due to their distinctive taste. In botanical circles, they're known as musk strawberries; in Jane Austen's day, they were called hautboys.

What's the Latest Development?


Starting this month, and for a few weeks only, British grocery chain Waitrose is offering an heirloom fruit, musk strawberries, under the name "bubbleberries" because of their unusual flavor, which some say is just like American-style bubble gum and others describe as something of a cross between pineapple, raspberry and strawberry. Buyer Bikki Baggott says the small berries are certainly unique: "This is one of the most aromatic berries we have ever sold...[It] has an incredibly strong perfume which will take you straight back to your childhood."

What's the Big Idea?

Known officially as Fragaria moschata, the musk strawberry's salad days, so to speak, were in the 18th and 19th centuries, when it was also called hautboy (from the French hautbois). Even Jane Austen made a point of including it in her novel Emma, where a character describes it as "infinitely superior—no comparison—the others hardly eatable." Although more popular varieties of Fragaria took over some time ago, musk strawberries still grow wild in some European forests. They can also grow in gardens; seeds are available from several online retailers.

Photo Credit: Wikipedia/Dendrofil

Read it at The Telegraph

Big Think Edge
  • The meaning of the word 'confidence' seems obvious. But it's not the same as self-esteem.
  • Confidence isn't just a feeling on your inside. It comes from taking action in the world.
  • Join Big Think Edge today and learn how to achieve more confidence when and where it really matters.
Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies
  • There are 2 different approaches to governing free speech on college campuses.
  • One is a morality/order approach. The other is a bottom-up approach.
  • Emily Chamlee-Wright says there are many benefits to having no one central authority on what is appropriate speech.

USA ranked 27th in the world in education and healthcare—down from 6th in 1990

America continues to tread water in healthcare and education while other countries have enacted reforms to great effect.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The American healthcare and education systems are known to need some work, but a new study suggests we've fallen far in comparison to the rest of the world.
  • The findings show what progress, if any, 195 countries have made over the last twenty years
  • The study suggests that economic growth is tied to human capital, which gives a dire view of America's economic prospects.
Keep reading Show less
Big Think Edge
  • Economist Sylvia Ann Hewlett breaks down what qualities will inspire others to believe in you.
  • Here's how 300 leaders and 4,000 mid-level managers described someone with executive presence.
  • Get more deep insights like these to power your career forward. Join Big Think Edge.