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David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
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Bryan Cranston
Actor
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Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
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Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
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Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Indentured Insomnia: Why the Poor Can't Sleep at Night

Being poor results in sleeping less for a variety of reasons. One major factor is public transportation and the fact that conforming to bus schedules can sometimes take hours out of one's sleep schedule each day.

How much sleep you get is strongly correlated with how much money you make, according to a Gallup poll that compared annual income with people's average nightly rest. The reality is a stark one, especially for immigrants who came to the US looking for a better way of life. The Atlantic profiles Sam McCalman who emigrated from Guyana, a small country that borders Venezuela and Brazil. Living in a cramped New York studio apartment, McCalman works two jobs at the JFK airport and typically sleeps four hours a night. 


Being poor results in sleeping less for a variety of reasons. One major factor is public transportation and the fact that conforming to bus schedules can sometimes take hours out of one's sleep schedule each day. Naturally another factor is money. Low-skilled workers must often clock nearly 80 hours of work per week just to make ends meet in the nation's more expensive locales like New York City. 

Compounding sleep issues are health problems that accompany a lack of sleep, from weight gain to sleep apnea. For workers who take on a night shift to pay the bills, the body's shifting circadian rhythm can result in even less sleep and require a day (one of your days off) to readjust to a daytime schedule. In her Big Think interview, sleep psychologist Shelby Harris explains how science can help you find a better sleep pattern:

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Neom, Saudi Arabia's $500 billion megacity, reaches its next phase

Construction of the $500 billion dollar tech city-state of the future is moving ahead.

Credit: Neom
Technology & Innovation
  • The futuristic megacity Neom is being built in Saudi Arabia.
  • The city will be fully automated, leading in health, education and quality of life.
  • It will feature an artificial moon, cloud seeding, robotic gladiators and flying taxis.
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Your emotions are the new hot commodity — and there’s an app for that

Many of the most popular apps are about self-improvement.

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Personal Growth

Emotions are the newest hot commodity, and we can't get enough.

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Study details the negative environmental impact of online shopping

Frequent shopping for single items adds to our carbon footprint.

A truck pulls out of a large Walmart regional distribution center on June 6, 2019 in Washington, Utah.

Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new study shows e-commerce sites like Amazon leave larger greenhouse gas footprints than retail stores.
  • Ordering online from retail stores has an even smaller footprint than going to the store yourself.
  • Greening efforts by major e-commerce sites won't curb wasteful consumer habits. Consolidating online orders can make a difference.
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Future of Learning

The key to better quality education? Make students feel valued.

Building a personal connection with students can counteract some negative side effects of remote learning.

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