How Wearable Computers Will Improve the Culture

Google's new glasses, which work like a hands-free smartphone, will continue to erase technological barriers to entering modern culture. Our storytelling ability stands to benefit greatly. 

What's the Latest Development?


Technology developers can now purchase Google's glasses, which work like a hands-free smartphone to display information, such as websites and emails, in your natural field of vision. Google's Project Glass, which developed the glasses, is significant because it represents a new generation of wearable electronics, effectively getting technology out of our way so we can enjoy its benefits, rather than being beholden to them. Instead of constantly looking at our mobile devices, as we do now, the next generation of devices will look at us and anticipate what we want. 

What's the Big Idea?

Bits blog writer Nick Bolton says Google's Project Glass will revolutionize our culture just as the motion picture did. The genius of the motion picture was its ability to erase barriers to entering the culture which were first erected by the book, barriers such as age, education, literacy and intelligence. "All these things share one distinct trait," said Bolton. "A theme that has helped usher in new technologies since people drew on cave walls: storytelling. Storytelling for information and communication." By making technological interfaces more seamless, our storytelling abilities will improve, and along with it, our culture.

Photo credit: Project Glass

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