How to Search For a New Job Without Alerting Your Current Employer

The reason why isn't important. If you want to keep your job search a secret, the key is erasing potential clues while maintaining a strong office poker face.

There are plenty of reasons why someone who already has a job would want to go the stealthy route when searching for new employment. Yet no matter the impetus, the deployable tactics  for under-the-radar job hunting remain the same. Donna Fuscaldo of Fox Business has a piece up today with a bevy of tips for keeping your job search on the down-low, despite the fact that keeping secrets from your boss is harder now than ever:


"Finding a job is tough enough, but doing it on the sly can be downright impossible. In this era of LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter it’s pretty easy for your boss to see what you are up to, and that includes searching for a new job."

So what does Fuscaldo suggest? Really, the key is to make sure you don't leave behind any clues on your journey to new employment. This means taking simple (almost obvious) precautionary steps. These include:

-Staying off the company computer

-Not using your company e-mail address

-Adjust your settings on LinkedIn so new connections aren't broadcasted to your co-workers

-Rely on private messaging

-Utilizing job boards

Fuscaldo goes into more detail in her piece (linked below) and emphasizes that just because you don't want to be found out doesn't mean you should ease up on expanding your personal network. 

"You can spend hours and hours applying to jobs online, but one of the most effective ways to land a new gig is through your network. Some workers will skip the networking aspect of the job hunt out of fear word will spread to the wrong person that they are looking for greener pastures. But doing that will hurt your prospects big time."

Read more at Fox Business

Photo credit: BPTU / Shutterstock

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